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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Quote:


Linux has a reputation for robustness but there are still plenty of ways to damage a perfectly working system.

Here we share some of the ways you can trash Linux so you don't make the same mistakes we did.


Source

I like number 4, cause it has been discussed here, how some will blindly follow a guide on the internet, or running scripts from the net and really don't know all that it is doing.
 

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Thanks for those.


They missed one of the more dangerous ones, though - how easy it is to get root access without a password if you know how to hit seven keys...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paradigm Shifter;15275629
Thanks for those.
smile.gif


They missed one of the more dangerous ones, though - how easy it is to get root access without a password if you know how to hit seven keys...
I'm curious now...what 7 keys?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rookie1337;15279367
I'm curious now...what 7 keys?
Code:

Code:
sudo sh
Results in root terminal access, no password required (at least none of the distros I've tried out recently have required you to enter a root password for it)...

It's one of the reasons I detest sudo. Security horror waiting to happen.

edit: Spotted your raptor 'Rage' avatar... quite amusing.
smile.gif
 

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I actually disagree with 8 and 12. Arch Linux is a prime example of how bleeding edge software can be run with minimal problems. And people completely over blow on pulseaudio. All it is: Install pulseaudio along with plugins, change some very simple text to get plugins to recognize it... and thats it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
if sudo is setup correctly it will ask for your password, unless you or your distro setup sudo not to ask for password for say some one who is in the wheel group.

i just tried it out on my beta of 11.10 ubuntu, and it ask for the password like i figured it would.
Quote:
Originally Posted by uncholowapo;15279652
I actually disagree with 8 and 12. Arch Linux is a prime example of how bleeding edge software can be run with minimal problems. And people completely over blow on pulseaudio. All it is: Install pulseaudio along with plugins, change some very simple text to get plugins to recognize it... and thats it.
then you been fortunate on the bleeding edge not breaking your install yet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by JedixJarf;15279704
My favorite would be sudo rm -rf /
Code:

Code:
[email protected]:/media/websites$ sudo rm -rf /
rm: it is dangerous to operate recursively on `/'
rm: use --no-preserve-root to override this failsafe
seems like its been "covered", not sure about other distro's, but ubuntu doesn't let you make a noob move like that, well at least not without another step.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by transhour
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if sudo is setup correctly it will ask for your password, unless you or your distro setup sudo not to ask for password for say some one who is in the wheel group.

Indeed. If it's been set up right.


Quote:


Originally Posted by transhour
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i just tried it out on my beta of 11.10 ubuntu, and it ask for the password like i figured it would.

11.04 doesn't - or didn't, when I tested it in a VM. From listening to one of the sysadmins at work, earlier Ubuntu's didn't by default either... and give that Ubuntu tries to be the 'easy' linux...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by transhour;15279750

Code:

Code:
[email protected]:/media/websites$ sudo rm -rf /
rm: it is dangerous to operate recursively on `/'
rm: use --no-preserve-root to override this failsafe
seems like its been "covered", not sure about other distro's, but ubuntu doesn't let you make a noob move like that, well at least not without another step.
Ubuntu: Build by noobs, built for noobs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
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Originally Posted by Paradigm Shifter
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Indeed. If it's been set up right.


11.04 doesn't - or didn't, when I tested it in a VM. From listening to one of the sysadmins at work, earlier Ubuntu's didn't by default either... and give that Ubuntu tries to be the 'easy' linux...

hmm, i'll check my other vm's i have of 10.04, 10.10 and 11.04
(might have a 9.10 and 9.04 iso hanging around.)

Quote:


Originally Posted by JedixJarf
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Ubuntu: Build by noobs, built for noobs.

depends what you consider a noob
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by transhour
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depends what you consider a noob


Agreed. I like ubuntu, I know some people like Linux to be a spartan experience, and there are those who just detest Ubuntu because its basically a snapshot of Debian testing. I like it, I can, and already have configured Debian into a usable state, and I am an ex-Fedora developer and contributor, and in no way do I consider myself a noob, but for one reason or another I like it.

Perhaps its because it's a lot of people's first distro they use...mine was Suse back when it was still basically Slackware.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by ishimura2446
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Agreed. I like ubuntu, I know some people like Linux to be a spartan experience, and there are those who just detest Ubuntu because its basically a snapshot of Debian testing. I like it, I can, and already have configured Debian into a usable state, and I am an ex-Fedora developer and contributor, and in no way do I consider myself a noob, but for one reason or another I like it.

Perhaps its because it's a lot of people's first distro they use...mine was Suse back when it was still basically Slackware.

Eh, still saps the fun out of using linux. Started out with YDL on my PS3, I can say that editing that yaboot.conf file for the first time made me feel like a 1337 [email protected] lol

You know, I feel like they should add Gentoo's automatic installer to the list. Even though that was from like 2008 or something, it was my first venture into linux outside of RPM and thought it wouldn't effect my Windows partition when I selected the "Format for me" option
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by uncholowapo
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Eh, still saps the fun out of using linux.

When you spend all day fixing linux boxes and servers when they break it becomes fun no longer. And I don't mean break by a hardware standpoint. Plus I don't like having to make sure that the debian release included the software for a particular piece of hardware because it wasn't FOSS or what not, when I could boot into Ubuntu, Knoppix, or another Debian build and have the driver pre installed.

Really I don't even use Debian or it's offspring that often though


Also for those Backtrack fans out there, it becomes less fun when you have to penetration test for a living too
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by ishimura2446
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When you spend all day fixing linux boxes and servers when they break it becomes fun no longer. And I don't mean break by a hardware standpoint. Plus I don't like having to make sure that the debian release included the software for a particular piece of hardware because it wasn't FOSS or what not, when I could boot into Ubuntu, Knoppix, or another Debian build and have the driver pre installed.

Really I don't even use Debian or it's offspring that often though


Also for those Backtrack fans out there, it becomes less fun when you have to penetration test for a living too


LOL. But don't you have fun with the neighbors? And don't you take the money...I mean get paid enough? It's a good thing I can't hack because I'm sure the temptation to do prankish things would too great.

PS: Currently/previously guilty of #s 4-7, 11, and 16(but only on the 4GB desktop). Strangely still enjoy Linux more for everyday computing than Windows.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Quote:


Originally Posted by Paradigm Shifter
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Indeed. If it's been set up right.


11.04 doesn't - or didn't, when I tested it in a VM. From listening to one of the sysadmins at work, earlier Ubuntu's didn't by default either... and give that Ubuntu tries to be the 'easy' linux...

i tried with all the iso's i have, these are unaltered, fresh installs in vbox of these versions of ubuntu. i'm trying to get my hands onto iso's of 8.10 and 9.04 and any early versions to test this out.

when i get them, i'll will test this little "statement" out, and verify its authenticity. my guess is right now, is you or your sysadmin made a change that altered how sudo or the sudoer file worked.

sorry didn't mean to target your post out specifically, i just don't care much for "misinformation" without evidence.

11.04


10.10


10.04


9.10


9.04


8.10


8.04


7.10


7.04


alright went all the way back to 7.04, and sudo appears to be setup correctly in them...




 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by Rookie1337
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LOL. But don't you have fun with the neighbors? And don't you take the money...I mean get paid enough? It's a good thing I can't hack because I'm sure the temptation to do prankish things would too great.


No I don't really prank the neighbors, I have an "apprentice" who is learning from me and pranks his often. The pay is great but I do things because I enjoy them, I follow the saying "if you love what you do you won't work a day in your life." I should have phrased my previous post better, I guess after fixing broken things all day I want my stuff to just work.

And yes "hacking" is an adventure, like a puzzle to me but sending data to the "brute server" as I call it and documenting it all and putting together a presentation outlining the threats etc is just boring. I guess 1 tenth of the testing is fun the rest is boring paperwork and waiting
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by Paradigm Shifter
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Code:
Code:
sudo sh
Results in root terminal access, no password required (at least none of the distros I've tried out recently have required you to enter a root password for it)...

If you did that on a Live CD I'm not surprised it didn't ask you for a password.
 
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