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Discussion Starter #1
I was wondering if there is an aftermarket alternative for temp sensors for cpu, gpu, memory, case, etc... I am running MBM 5 and it has temps for cpu and case, but I think the case temp is a boldfaced lie. There's no way my cpu can be colder than the case. Where is the temp being measured from? I run an Asrock K8S8X motherboard and I am guessing the case temp may be my northbridge temp which could be correct since I don't have a fan on it, but it has a large stock heatsink.

http://www.asrockamerica.com/Products/k8s8x.htm
 

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If you are willing to spend the money on certain fan controllers, most of them have temperature probes (meaning, the ones with LCD screens have probes)

I have a Nexus, and since it has no read-outs, it has no probes.

Newegg and other sites have strictly temp monitors for 5.25" bays...most are well priced, worth looking into. I dont trust most MBM 5 readouts too, especially when they say stupid things like case being warmer than CPU.
 

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How cold is too cold? How hot is too hot? Measuring temps is only useful if you know what the limits are. Not just for the cpu, but for everything really. Also makes me wonder at what point in a single loop water cooling setup have you lost efficiency if you add chipset coolers, hard drive, etc.. to a typical cpu/gpu cooling loop. Is there better fluid than water for heat transfer? That sort of thing. I thought it would be nice to get accurate temp baselines of my stuff before I pushed further in speed.
 

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All those questions are excellent questions.

The thing you need up front is ACCURATE temperature readings!

The question about water, the dissipation ability is driven by your pump and radiator setup.

Strong pump that can deliver lots of flow and head (pressure), and a heatcore? You could add a chipset block, cpu block, and even a gpu block in most cases.

For a weaker system like mine, a cpu block is all I can do at the moment (and is really all I need for now)

There are some better fluids for heat transfer, but for safety and corrosion concersn, water with an additive is the best way to go. Xerex (I think) can be found at any autoparts store...and "water wetter".

I think you are making perfect sense, as far as determining a baseline of temps before pushing further. Again, you'll need accurate, and it looks as if MBM is not accurate at the moment for you.

Really no such thing as too cold... Too hot? Depends on what component you are referring...
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I have a friend that works in heating/cooling. He's actually the head of the mechanicals union. So, I could get my hands on your typical AC coolant. RF22 or something. If it leaks, it leaks as a gas, so thats got to be safer in that regards. Copper tubing is the typical choice for waterblocks, so I guess the tubing would be a possible weak link. Anyway, its a goofy idea that I thought of just now.

I realize the pump overhead is always a concern, I was merely looking at it from the standpoint of saturation of the coolant with too many devices absorbing heat. I guess logic would dictate possibly adding a secondary radiator after a particular item to return the coolant to a low temp. Has anyone made a radiator setup such that the coolant goes to each item individually and returns to the radiator? My hunch is that is the secondary reasoning behind resevoirs. My swiftech kit was meant to not have a resevoir, but I added one. I simply do not have heat fins on the resevoir to add to the cooling the "holding" provides.
 
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