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I broke the fuel door opening spring on my avalon last winter when it was crazy cold out. Just replaced it and all is well again. No more pulling the release lever 50 times to get the filler door open lol. Also up to 308,000 miles.
Nice milestone. Went for a mountain rip yesterday morning in the 201K mile E46. Maybe I'm putting too much trust in it, but it's very mechanically sound. Absolutely pleasure to drive as well, typically I've just been warming it up once every week or so and only drive it properly one or two times a month, but every time I do I'm reminded of how fun it is.
 

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Eastern Bloc Electronics
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1,682 Posts
Over here it is estimated that something like 80-90% of the cars imported from the west have rolled odometers.
400-500+ kkm (300+k miles) is quite often the real mileage while odometer shows the classic ~180kkm.
Some started going with ~250k km as the real mileage is getting too hard to hide on older cars.

201k miles on E46 is not much really, if it's the real mileage.
Of course it depends on the engine, diesel can take more mileage.
Taxi drivers could put on 600-700k km on those things without much issues.

I still have auction screenshot with LS430 having 725k km (453k miles).
Drove a 378k km 93' GS300 and sew several offers with 500-600k km still running strong.
General state of the car and the service history is more important.
 

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LTSC for life crew
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Over here it is estimated that something like 40-60% of cars on the road will not last beyond 100k miles and will end up in the junkyard being only useful for parts. I would go out on a limb to say that most of the cars that make up that statistic are either being totalled in a crash or made by General Motors in which case they will fail completely and need to be totally rebuilt by 70k miles. Over here we call Chevy's "throw away cars".

We have a very serious issue with lack of dependability with many of our modern american made cars. They are designed to need frequent repairs over their lifetime because this helps to create more profit for the auto parts manufacturers. Though some models are quite dependable and well built, like the Ford panther cars and the Chrysler LX platform cars.
 

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Just crossed 215k on the STi.

Outside of full size diesel trucks, pretty much every American made car seems to be destined for the scrap yard shortly after hitting 100k.

It doesn't help that emissions laws, in the most populous areas, make it difficult and/or impossible to get something that's not new or 30+ years old registered. There is some serious anti-engineering that was done by American manufacturers to comply with emissions laws from one state. Working on a gas motor in a car from the late 70's - mid-90's is a nightmare of vacuum trees and lines.
 

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Still beats working on a late 90's early 2000's french box with the same issues exept they aren't vacuum lines but bundles of failing electronics lol.
 

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LTSC for life crew
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Subaru makes dependable cars. My sister's outback went from new to 200k miles without any major or even minor repairs AFAIK. One of the few brands of car I'd buy new and keep for the long haul. Also dat AWD is always nice to have when the weather turns crappy.

Edit: My Nissan 240SX had the SOHC motor which was just nasty as far as vacuum line spaghetti goes. I deleted a bunch of it and it did indeed run quite good afterwards.
 

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Premium Member
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Over here it is estimated that something like 80-90% of the cars imported from the west have rolled odometers.
400-500+ kkm (300+k miles) is quite often the real mileage while odometer shows the classic ~180kkm.
Some started going with ~250k km as the real mileage is getting too hard to hide on older cars.

201k miles on E46 is not much really, if it's the real mileage.
Of course it depends on the engine, diesel can take more mileage.
Taxi drivers could put on 600-700k km on those things without much issues.

I still have auction screenshot with LS430 having 725k km (453k miles).
Drove a 378k km 93' GS300 and sew several offers with 500-600k km still running strong.
General state of the car and the service history is more important.
201K is the real mileage, my dad purchased it new back in '02 or '03 and gave it to me in 2016 at 178K when he got a different car. It has spent maybe 95% of its life as a commuter car, so pretty easy miles. Only now am I really wringing it out consistently. Certainly has some wear and tear but it's pretty good all things considered. Been thinking about what to do with it long term.

By the way it's a 330, so M54.
 

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Eastern Bloc Electronics
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1,682 Posts
That also depends on what you call commuter.
Highway miles are the easiest ones.

Some time ago a 440k km FSO Polonez was discovered.
Engines in those cars were really bad. Some required a rebuild before 100k km (62.5k miles).
And it even had original 20+ year old factory installed clutch.
It was only doing highway.
Constant rpm means no transient loads.

With 200k miles and good service history I would expect it to last 300k or more miles.
Looked up BMW forums and there were several with ~250k miles so I guess it's safe to assume it still has life in it.
And knowing most of them are with rolled odometers I would expect the real numbers to be even higher.
 

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Premium Member
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That also depends on what you call commuter.
Highway miles are the easiest ones.

Some time ago a 440k km FSO Polonez was discovered.
Engines in those cars were really bad. Some required a rebuild before 100k km (62.5k miles).
And it even had original 20+ year old factory installed clutch.
It was only doing highway.
Constant rpm means no transient loads.

With 200k miles and good service history I would expect it to last 300k or more miles.
Looked up BMW forums and there were several with ~250k miles so I guess it's safe to assume it still has life in it.
And knowing most of them are with rolled odometers I would expect the real numbers to be even higher.
When both my dad and I used it as a daily, it spent probably 80% of its life on the highway, so easy miles indeed. Some interior bits should be replaced but it's all functional. Mechanically, the only issues are VANOS, what I presume is a rubber coupling in the steering that gives me some play in the wheel, and possibly some worn engine/trans mounts. Evidently it's on its original clutch, which I honestly find a bit hard to believe but considering its history and what you've seen, maybe it's actually quite plausible.
 

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No rubber in the steering that I know of. Check your balljoints.
Based on what I've read, this guy is the culprit:

But yeah, eventually I should just go through and replace most every gasket/ball joint/bushing in there.
 

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toast toast!
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1,212 Posts
Developed a sticky caliper. Was driving the other week and after an hour or so got some very unbalanced braking. Still, they've never been touched beyond replacing the pads in 29 years, so they haven't done too badly. I would have dealt with this sooner but it's been raining for a week. Once I got the car up in the air it was clear the pads were binding up a bit on that side, and they were a pain to remove.

I've already rebuilt the rears which are 2 pot versions of the same design for the hell of it, so hopefully this should be a similar process. I've ordered a new set of pistons too since they aren't that expensive.

I also need to find a brake accumulator sphere. It was the same one used in the Saab 900 and Buick Reatta. AC Delco used to make the part but discontinued it. Allegedly one from a Mercedes works, but the pressure rating is much lower than the Jaguar's so I wouldn't trust it. The best alternative I've found is one from a RHD Cadillac Seville. Not a car I've ever come across, and I can't get the part, but they are abundant and well priced in the US. No idea how much it's going to cost to import one yet.


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LTSC for life crew
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We normally call that a rag joint and they are common in cars. It's a crash safety mechanism but nobody likes them as they lead to worn steering. Also, any sort of play or wander on a BMW is a pretty big deal as they are known for being quite tight and well sorted especially at highway speeds.

Also I'm guessing those brake calipers came off of the jag? Whatever they came from they definitely mean business - those are some mighty strong & potent looking parts!
 

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toast toast!
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1,212 Posts
Yes those are XJS front brakes. Chunky calipers but the discs are small. A 15 inch wheel was large by 1975 standards, so you couldn't make discs the size of a steering wheel. As for the caliper, they're not a bad design. You can infinately rebuild them since the cylinder wall is not used for sealing.

In order to remove the pistons you're supposed to use an air compressor but I don't have one. On the rears I used a bleed kit to connect a tyre to the caliper, which worked, but it was possible to connect air to only one piston at a time. On these front calipers that can't be done so I can imagine they're going to be a bit harder. Still, I can always drill a hole through them and pull them out since they're getting replaced anyway.
 

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LTSC for life crew
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I haven't had the chance to crawl under a new bronco yet but it's likely to be the same setup as the ranger truck that it shares some parts with. It should be an electric assisted rack and pinion like the S2000 or original NSX.

Which is a plus because with a laptop and some simple software you can tune the steering feel to how you want it. And no hydraulic lines to leak and one less fluid to fill. I loved the electric steering rack in my 05 civic, but that may be because it was literally the same part number used in the S2K lol.
 

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I can count to potato
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818 Posts
I've finally decided to start doing some work on the Miata. My sister got married in Vegas last weekend so I took this whole week off so I could have time to work on the car and isolate myself in case I caught the 'rona while traveling. First project was recovering my seats. The driver side recently developed some rips that were getting ugly. I want to get new seats but I figured I could just recover these to get me by for another year or two. Lotus Elise seats are a nice upgrade for tall people in Miatas but they are hard to find and expensive.

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Still working the creases out since they were packed pretty tight. Got these on ebay for $70 from someone that bought them and never installed them. Probably because they realized they aren't covers that just slip on. It was a huge PITA recovering the seats. Probably over a hundred hog rings holding everything together that had to be cut out. I put the new ones on with zip ties lol. Also took the opportunity to do a mild foamectomy on the passenger side. I already cut quite a bit out of the drivers side when I first got the car.

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I bought these coilovers as a Christmas present for myself last year... Not sure how I managed to put off installing them for this long. Also installed some prothane bushings on the rear sway bar while I had it off. Going to replace the front bar and add adjustable end links.

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This is how it sits currently. Slight rubbing on big bumps but it's drivable. I like to run the dampening fairly soft since the roads suck here and I don't want it to rub at all. So I'll do the whole stance nation thing for a couple days then raise it up.

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