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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I was completely shocked to learn that there are people from the south who were raised so isolated from culture that they do not know anything about modern music. These people have never ever listened to a classic rock song; for instance I was talking to someone about Angus Young and they actually had no clue who AC/DC was. When these people hear classic rock at work, they become cranky and agitated, seemingly annoyed that it's not bluegrass or dueling banjos. When Hotel California started playing I asked an older guy if he liked the Eagles he said yeah but all we have around here is turkey vultures.

No, I am not joking. They have been that isolated that some can't engage in conversation about any type of culture or even current events. Their minds seem to be stuck on some sort of weird thought process where they will talk about how they are "fixin' to do things" and then give you a ten-step account of how they changed a flat tire on their car by jacking it up with pieces wood beams that they used two years ago to trap a wild coyote after it attacked their hens.

When it's time to go home, they do not say "going home", they say "go to the house". As in "I'm ready to go to the house".

I looked at one guy completely dumbfounded. I said "you mean you're going home?" And he says "We'll we're not going there together!"

I had no clue what he meant.
 

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English, as spoken by people in the deep south, especially in smaller towns, is completely different from the English spoken elsewhere. I lived in TX for four years while going to college and it was like living in a foreign country. There, instead of saying "going home", they would say 'take it to the house". If you said "next Sunday" during the week, you would be referring to the second Sunday from then. If you wanted to refer to the first Sunday from then, you would say "Sunday next". "Bless his heart' could mean just that or it could be an absolution after bad mouthing someone, such as, after saying someone was an idiot, it would be followed by "bless his heart".

The biggest issue I have with southerners, however, is how bigoted and hateful so many of them are. Sadly, the most bigoted and hateful ones are the ones who profess to be good Christians (bless their hearts). I'm a Christian but, apparently, I worship a different God and Christ than they do.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
English, as spoken by people in the deep south, especially in smaller towns, is completely different from the English spoken elsewhere. I lived in TX for four years while going to college and it was like living in a foreign country. There, instead of saying "going home", they would say 'take it to the house". If you said "next Sunday" during the week, you would be referring to the second Sunday from then. If you wanted to refer to the first Sunday from then, you would say "Sunday next". "Bless his heart' could mean just that or it could be an absolution after bad mouthing someone, such as, after saying someone was an idiot, it would be followed by "bless his heart".

The biggest issue I have with southerners, however, is how bigoted and hateful so many of them are. Sadly, the most bigoted and hateful ones are the ones who profess to be good Christians (bless their hearts). I'm a Christian but, apparently, I worship a different God and Christ than they do.
I know what you mean when you say they are bigoted. Some of them act like they are members of the Westboro Baptist church or something. In fact I had to go to HR over one of them because he wouldn't stop using a certain derogatory term towards me. The imputation of sexual deviancy is defamation per se when disclosed to a third party for the purpose of shunning that individual or ostracising them from a group.
 

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Not a bad thing that they know nothing of this world. Gives them more time for the important things in life.
 

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Not a bad thing that they know nothing of this world. Gives them more time for the important things in life.
People being oblivious to the world around them is one reason the world is in the state it is in.
 

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I know what you mean when you say they are bigoted. Some of them act like they are members of the Westboro Baptist church or something. In fact I had to go to HR over one of them because he wouldn't stop using a certain derogatory term towards me. The imputation of sexual deviancy is defamation per se when disclosed to a third party for the purpose of shunning that individual or ostracising them from a group.
Imagine the field day they would have with me. ;)
 

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Sunday League Jibber
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English, as spoken by people in the deep south, especially in smaller towns, is completely different from the English spoken elsewhere. I lived in TX for four years while going to college and it was like living in a foreign country. There, instead of saying "going home", they would say 'take it to the house". If you said "next Sunday" during the week, you would be referring to the second Sunday from then. If you wanted to refer to the first Sunday from then, you would say "Sunday next". "Bless his heart' could mean just that or it could be an absolution after bad mouthing someone, such as, after saying someone was an idiot, it would be followed by "bless his heart".

The biggest issue I have with southerners, however, is how bigoted and hateful so many of them are. Sadly, the most bigoted and hateful ones are the ones who profess to be good Christians (bless their hearts). I'm a Christian but, apparently, I worship a different God and Christ than they do.
I had a massive culture shock on my first real sojourn to the US. Arizona State University had (has) excellent programmes for the Life Sciences and I thought that Phoenix would be an interesting change of pace. I'd visited previously, as my father had gone to live in Arizona for work years before, but this was my first real cultural immersion. Phoenix is quite metropolitan compared to much of the actual South, but it was still a shock to me to hear and see casual bigotry (mostly against Mexican people and LGBT people) that wasn't fully taboo. Oh, and the megachurches still make me deeply uncomfortable.

When I went home, I had mostly kind things to say, but I was left with a very distinct impression of the diversity of culture to be found in the US - something that many Britons and Europeans generally don't recognise despite the geographic footprint of the USA. It became all the more apparent when I came to Boston, MA for work, which is where I live now. The language is different, the culture is different (not that far from London, really), the climate is absurdly different... it really is like another country. I'm now known as the apologist amongst my family and friends because, when they want to paint the US with an overly broad brush, I'll always point out that Arizona and Massachusetts are in many ways more distinct than England and Wales. In England, we bemoan the idea that Americans can't tell a Scouser from a Geordie, but Londoners are just as guilty of assuming that a New Yorker is the same as a Texan.
 

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Everyone has a cultural bias. None are right compared to anyone else using their perspective, regardless of how "right" and logical we know we are. As for language pitfalls, my fav story is when in college I had a good friend who was a Swiss exchange student here in CA, USA. He completely freaked when I mentioned "I gotta use your head" after quaffing a few beers while watching soccer at his apartment. For those who are freaked now, "head" is US navy slang for toilet.
 
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