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Has anyone ever heard of a highly thermally conductive polymer substance? Like playdough or silly putty?
 

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Yeah, but I can't remember what it was called. I know they use for the underground piping it in geothermal heating and cooling systems...
 

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Here is an interesting site:<br />
<a href="http://www.coolpolymers.com/elastomers.asp" target="_blank">http://www.coolpolymers.com/elastomers.asp</a><br />
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They say their flexible conductive plastic can be formed into tubes. Imagine one continuous tube (or multiple capillary tubes) running over everything with blobs of the plastic sitting on the main chips. <br />
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I'm thinking of a way to basically combine the efficacy of OIL cooling with the cleanliness of air/water cooling.
 

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The advantage water has over other cooling systems isn't necessarily its thermal conductivity. It's water's specific heat that gives it the advantage. Water can absorb a LOT of energy without raising its temperature. I don't think the thermally conductive materials that you are talking about don't have nearly as high of specific heat as water does.
 

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<div style="font-style:italic">The advantage water has over other cooling systems isn't necessarily its thermal conductivity. It's water's specific heat that gives it the advantage. Water can absorb a LOT of energy without raising its temperature. I don't think the thermally conductive materials that you are talking about don't have nearly as high of specific heat as water does.</div>

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</div>Right...I'm talking about a flexible water capillary blanket that you can put on anything and it will conform to the shape very nicely. So, it's still water cooled...just like human skin is is controlled by capillaries, make a skin-like blanket for the Mobo. It can cover everything with modest adhesion so it can easily be removed.
 

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They use that stuff in the PS2, for the graphics and cpu processor. Its really fun to play with. and it transfers heat really well.<br />
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And the reason I know that is because I took my PS2 apart after it decided to go on fire..... The power connector in the unit decided to short out and yea it was fun.
 

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Originally Posted by <strong>atomicfission92</strong>

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<div style="font-style:italic">They use that stuff in the PS2, for the graphics and cpu processor. Its really fun to play with. and it transfers heat really well.<br />
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And the reason I know that is because I took my PS2 apart after it decided to go on fire..... The power connector in the unit decided to short out and yea it was fun.</div>

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</div>Can it pick up newspaper ink like real Silly Putty?
 

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Unless you are willing to pay a bunch I doubt you'll find anything. Generally thermoplastics (amorphous solids usually) are polymers. Polymer chains tend to be very long and very twisted. For thermal conductivity you want small, straight line paths through the material.<br />
While there are materials that have the qualities you have described, there is a great deal of engineering that went into them = pay out the *** for them
 

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I'm in for the testing when you get it figured out <img src="/images/smilies/wink.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Wink" class="inlineimg" />
 

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Originally Posted by <strong>rabidgnome229</strong>

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<div style="font-style:italic">Unless you are willing to pay a bunch I doubt you'll find anything. Generally thermoplastics (amorphous solids usually) are polymers. Polymer chains tend to be very long and very twisted. For thermal conductivity you want small, straight line paths through the material.<br />
While there are materials that have the qualities you have described, there is a great deal of engineering that went into them = pay out the *** for them</div>

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</div>Interesting...I wonder if they could capture water inside the polymer. Like a cellular structure. So, the heat would be carried away by water instead of using difficult manufacturing processes.
 

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No it couldn't pick up news print. It was black, and pretty dense the piece I had weighed a couple ounces, and it had the same feel to it as sheet lead.
 

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<div style="font-style:italic">No it couldn't pick up news print. It was black, and pretty dense the piece I had weighed a couple ounces, and it had the same feel to it as sheet lead.</div>

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</div>I wonder if it was a lead/tin or lead/magnesium alloy?
 

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Originally Posted by <strong>atomicfission92</strong>

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<div style="font-style:italic">Maybe, ill look for it, I might have it some where, If I do I could send it to you if you wanted.</div>

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Is it similar to the stuff Intel uses on the bottom of their stock air coolers?
 

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<div style="font-style:italic">Is it similar to the stuff Intel uses on the bottom of their stock air coolers?</div>

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</div>Im not sure, I haven't dealt with any intel's.<br />
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looked at some google pics of some stock intel heatsinks, and no that isn't it. The stuff I have is like 1/8" thick. Maybe a little thicker.<br />
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I am pretty sure this is what it was. <a href="http://www.stockwell.com/pages/materials_thermal.php" target="_blank">This</a> stuff.
 

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Originally Posted by <strong>FrankenPC</strong>

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<div style="font-style:italic">Interesting...I wonder if they could capture water inside the polymer. Like a cellular structure. So, the heat would be carried away by water instead of using difficult manufacturing processes.</div>

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</div>you can make polymer solutions - but the water would evaporate/boil with any kind of heating
 
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