Overclock.net banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
166 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I read about Intel's Tick-Tock strategy.

So tick is die shrink
and tock is "new architecture".

1. So is it safe to interpret new architecture is maximizing performance under specific die size?
2. Can you briefly explain new architecture?
3. From your experience with current and previous gen CPUs, is it more fun to OC CPU with new die shrink or new architecture? In other words, does new architecture have better overclocking potential from its stock setting than new die shrink CPUs?

I'm considering Ivy Bridge, but more importantly I love crazy OC, lasting pleasure, than a new system, a hype.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,485 Posts
Background

New architecture is essentially a new design. Think of the architecture as the blueprint for the electronic circuit.

The optical lithography process (90 nm, 65nm, 45 nm, 32 nm) is the way a processor is made. The blueprint is etched into the silicon. As the process nodes get smaller, die size shrinks. However, it is difficult to move to a new process. It takes time to find all the bugs and optimize production.

Intel's tick-tock is a way of mitigating manufacturing difficulty by using an architecture they are familiar with on a new node. This way, any problems are likely due to the node and not the proven acupuncture. Once they are comfortable with the node, they introduce a new architecture. This way, they do not introduce a new node and architecture at the same time.

Answers

1.
In theory, one can make any architecture on any process size (die size). In practice, one specific architecture may be optimized for a specific manufacturing process. Essentially, the new architecture is not maximizing the performance of a process size. It is simply a new blueprint built on a process Intel is familiar with.

2.
See background. New architecture is a new blueprint, or chip plan. Often, in new architectures processors are given more capability, such as instruction sets.

3.
With Intel, the new architectures have provided a bigger performance jump than new nodes. As for moving on to a new node, it has been a mixed bag. The jump from Kentsfield (65 nm) to Yorkfield (45 nm) was not as stellar as some expected. Typically, the new nodes lower the TDP (heat output) which makes it easier to overclock with specific cooling. This is really the biggest contributor to better overclocking on a new node.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,711 Posts
"Tick Tock" is a cool PR model...in practice whether they actually have historically done it is really debatable IMHO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
166 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Quote:


Originally Posted by Skripka
View Post

"Tick Tock" is a cool PR model...in practice whether they actually have historically done it is really debatable IMHO.

You are probably right. Tick Tock is a more sales strategy. I'm trying to address the issue from a consumer's point of view.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top