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Discussion Starter #1
Quote:
Transitioning to a heterogeneous design, which combines several separate components onto a single package, solves several problems. First, the smaller dies sidestep yield problems by reducing the chance of catastrophic defects. It also allows Intel to combine several different components with different processes onto the same package. That lets the company use larger nodes for the harder-to-shrink or purpose-built components. It also decouples development cycles for analog and digital devices, thus decreasing time to market.
Intel is discussing using what looks like multiple dies at first glance.

< sarcasm > Are they glued together? </ sarcasm >

Source:
http://www.tomshardware.com/news/intel-emib-interconnect-fpga-chiplet,35316.html

EDIT: Fixed the link
 

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Smug, Jaded, Enervated.
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You might wanna provide a link to the source as well..
 

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why not also include the PCH on package?

then they could let the mobo AIBs to decide what kind of 3rd-party controllers they'd add, e.g. extra SATA III controller, USB, LAN, etc.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gilles3000 View Post

Oh the irony.
rolleyes.gif
Tastes like glue.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by epic1337 View Post

why not also include the PCH on package?

then they could let the mobo AIBs to decide what kind of 3rd-party controllers they'd add, e.g. extra SATA III controller, USB, LAN, etc.
WHAT? BLASPHEMER! You don't let 3rd party control anything. Iron grip on segmentation and related up charge must remain firmly in Intel's hand.

Yes, I kid. Kidding on the square that is.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Liranan View Post

Tastes like glue.
coincidentally, intel's solder tastes like irony.
biggrin.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by BulletBait View Post

WHAT? BLASPHEMER! You don't let 3rd party control anything. Iron grip on segmentation and related up charge must remain firmly in Intel's hand.

Yes, I kid. Kidding on the square that is.
its basically a SoC, though not a monolithic SoC.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by PostalTwinkie View Post

Intel is sick, truly disconnected and sick.

Do they not think we aren't going to notice their hipocracy?
No, because Intel won't use glue.

Quote:
Originally Posted by epic1337 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Liranan View Post

Tastes like glue.
coincidentally, intel's solder tastes like irony.
biggrin.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by BulletBait View Post

WHAT? BLASPHEMER! You don't let 3rd party control anything. Iron grip on segmentation and related up charge must remain firmly in Intel's hand.

Yes, I kid. Kidding on the square that is.
its basically a SoC, though not a monolithic SoC.
Like AMD's design? Damned, Intel are as revolutionary as Apple.
 

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It doesn't seem to be about combing multiple CPU dies. It seems that instead of building one die with graphics, I/O, and other chips all integrated, they want to be able to have different die for each onboard component (which can be configured depending on the application), which isn't what AMD is doing with Ryzen.

Seems similar to AMD's chiplet.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pyrotagonist View Post

It doesn't seem to be about combing multiple CPU dies. It seems that instead of building one die with graphics, I/O, and other chips all integrated, they want to be able to have different die for each onboard component (which can be configured depending on the application), which isn't what AMD is doing with Ryzen.

Seems similar to AMD's chiplet.
What AMD is doing with Ryzen and Threadripper is just the earliest of stages in efforts to create a true desktop class SoC. More than a few times on this forum we have had conversations about where computing is going. Although, it is starting to happen at a much quicker rate than expected. We are now a few generations away from a desktop PC being an SoC, with the only thing external being expanded storage. Of course we will still have discrete systems like now, with separate CPU, GPU, Memory, Storage, all mainly focused at the high-end. However, all the other classes of compute will be straight SoC.

In parallel to this, actually starting with the new iPhone 8 coming out, you are going to see a move to where the phone and PC are the same. The SoC will truly be efficient and powerful enough that, with high bandwidth USB-C, you will just dock the phone at home to a station connected to keyboard, mouse, and display. There simply won't be a need for a computer at home for most people, the phone turned personal compute device is powerful enough.

If you look at what Apple is doing with the new iPhone 8 and what Microsoft is doing with mobile, especially with Windows on ARM, you can see ground work being laid for the move to that one device scenario. We sit at a point where software actually needs to catch up to hardware, so that when the hardware is available, people can make the move.

Just a little personal guess, based off how things look now; In 36 months most people will be able to ditch the desktop computer because their phone will be all they need. USB-C can support the bandwidth to drive the nicest of video, and even the current Apple A11x is just a complete monster. As soon as the software is there to make the phone and desktop eco-system the same, the move happens.

DELL and HP will partner with T-Mobile and Verizon to sell co-branded devices, likely offering promotions like the first year of service is free. On the service side the industry will finely get rid of their bandwidth limiting for those customers/devices, and that will be that. You have your device that is with you and works wherever you go. What you don't store locally on the device will be in the Cloud or your person external storage.

The only real concern is Apple and others intentionally stunting the roll out to protect computer and tablet sales.

....
........that turned into a bit of a ramble.
 

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all i see is both companies going for some innovation.
AMD was short for R&D and did what was possible at that time.

read the article people and grow up
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BulletBait View Post

You lost me at Apple and anything innovative.
lachen.gif
Come now, credit is due where credit is due.

What Apple did with their SoC design, Jim Keller was part of earlier, has been incredible for mobile. Apple mobile SoC are in their own league and have been the driving force for increased mobile performance in a lot of ways.

Steve Jobs innovated in the sales and marketing aspect. Getting people to follow the Apple ethos like a religion. No matter how sad that may be, it worked like magic.
 
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