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I'm installing Ubuntu as the secondary OS on my neighbors PC. Windows is on the SSD and I partitioned 100GB of the HDD for Linux. After installing it there is no GRUB, it just boots straight to Windows. Is there anyway I can correct this without a reinstall of everything?
 

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For a quick and dirty answer, to see grub and the linux partition listed, you would need to change the boot order to start with the HDD that has Ubuntu installed on it. I am currently looking up solutions to have grub or something similar see multiple OS installations across multiple physical drives. For the time being, and yes hindsight is 20/20, it would have been better to have installed Ubuntu on the same drive as the Windows installation by shrinking the partition to make room on that HDD. I will keep looking for further help on this though.
 

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After a little bit of research, it seems you can use something like EasyBCD to add that boot partition to the windows boot loader and that way you wont have to mess with changing the boot order in the BIOS making everything much easier. I have personally never used it but there seems to be quite a bit on google about how to get it going and working for you. This will also help you by not having to reinstall anything or overwrite bootloaders.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by xioticin View Post

it would have been better to have installed Ubuntu on the same drive as the Windows installation by shrinking the partition to make room on that HDD.
I disagree, Installing linux to its own drive and installing grub to the linux drive is always better. It's best to retain the windows boot loader. If the time comes that linux is no longer wanted, only a bios boot order adjustment is needed to bring the machine back to its original state without the hassle of restoring the windows boot loader.
 
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Discussion Starter #5
I went ahead and used easyBCD and it did something fun. While it did fix the issue it essentially pointed the Windows bootloader to GRUB so you have to pick Ubuntu in two bootloaders.

A little background on the issue. My neighbor was trying to do this build on a tight budget and he managed to get a very nice 24" 1080 IPS monitor as well as a box of other stuff that included an 160GB Intel 320series SSD. Due to the small size of the SSD I decided to put Linux on the 500GB HDD so he could put AutoDesk on the SSD. Normally I would have had it all on the same drive, but AutoDesk is large and I wanted to try to keep it at no more than 60-70% full.

As for installing Linux on its own drive Diffident, even with GRUB on a seperate drive due to the partition the PC would still boot Windows and not bring up GRUB.
 

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I just got to where I can look up more about this. I do have a question about your bios settings though. Is either secure boot or fast boot turned on in the bios? I am trying to see if there is any solution that will work here. I have read a bit about how Windows 10 changes are the reason why EasyBCD doesn't always work/wont work and that there might not be a quick fix for this though most of these posts are from last year.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by NameUnknown View Post

I went ahead and used easyBCD and it did something fun. While it did fix the issue it essentially pointed the Windows bootloader to GRUB so you have to pick Ubuntu in two bootloaders.

A little background on the issue. My neighbor was trying to do this build on a tight budget and he managed to get a very nice 24" 1080 IPS monitor as well as a box of other stuff that included an 160GB Intel 320series SSD. Due to the small size of the SSD I decided to put Linux on the 500GB HDD so he could put AutoDesk on the SSD. Normally I would have had it all on the same drive, but AutoDesk is large and I wanted to try to keep it at no more than 60-70% full.

As for installing Linux on its own drive Diffident, even with GRUB on a seperate drive due to the partition the PC would still boot Windows and not bring up GRUB.
You need to make the drive with grub installed as the boot drive in the bios, it may need to be changed in 2 places if it's like mine.
 
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So this particular PC is actually running Windows 7, not 10. In the BIOS both Secure & Fast Boot are disabled and the SSD is in as the primary boot drive thus why Windows wanted to boot first. In an attempt though to make it so I could get into Linux before using easyBCD I hit F11 and picked the HDD but didnt change the boot order. This still resulted in Windows 7 booting and I suspect its because of the partitioning it into 2 drives.

Down the road I'll do it without partitioning or on the same drive to avoid these issues. Thank you all for your input on this, its been insightful and helpful.
 

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As a matter of safe policy I always install any bootloader to "/root" first and then decide whether or not to also install to MBR. This way all one has to do is use a simple rescue disc to point the loader to "/root" (or "/boot" if you use that as a separate partition) and the system is up and running.

Also having one system's bootloader point to another may take the millisecond required to hit Carriage Return/Enter but that is a miniscule price to pay for easy maintenance and disaster recovery.. One of these millennia UEFI will get around to utilizing all that nice new room to be a truly effective bootloader on it's own. Until then, play it safe.
 
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