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Hey guys, i just saw the most wicked thing in my science class, where single displacement was performed. I placed a Pure Silver Screwdriver into a beaker of CUSO4, which had displaced the CU with SILVER since silver had a higher or somethign... Im 100% SURE the surface turned Copper, but im not so sure about if the inside had as well. So, would this be a worthy FAQ / experiment? Thanks. =)
 

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O.O really? I always thought copper had better conductivity, thats why everyone buys Copper Hs's Over Silver.. hmm. or am i gettin somehtign messed up here.. lol
 

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Because copper looks cooler, duh. Lol jk. Ya hes right.

Edit: Actually i thought copper was the bes also???
 

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Copper's cheaper and not much worse than silver. The most common metals in heatsinks are aluminum and copper. Anything else is too expensive/crappy.
 

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in terms of conductivity its copper silver gold platinum

and it probably wasn't a pure silver screw driver. It was most likely a silver alloy on the outside, I could try to explain details but i know more about organic reactions
 

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I think you're confused with aluminum heat sinks. everyone buys copper over aluminum because copper is more conductive than aluminum... and thus copper makes better heatsinks. just because the color is 'sliver' does not mean that is actually what the heat sink is made out of.

silver heatsinks are better than copper because silver is more conductive than copper... that is why we use AS5 or another silver based thermal compound.

and I'll agree w/ the comment above that the screwdriver was probably not pure silver... silver is too soft a metal for a screwdriver. it's too malable.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by UberN00B

Hey guys, i just saw the most wicked thing in my science class, where single displacement was performed. I placed a Pure Silver Screwdriver into a beaker of CUSO4, which had displaced the CU with SILVER since silver had a higher or somethign... Im 100% SURE the surface turned Copper, but im not so sure about if the inside had as well. So, would this be a worthy FAQ / experiment? Thanks. =)

Yes aluminum would replace copper in copper sulfate (CuSO4) because the aluminum is more electronegative than copper. This reaction would take the copper ions out of solution and deposit them on the surface of the screwdriver/heatsink and the aluminum would be ionized and enter solution with the sulfate ions. I don't think silver would do the same because it is less electronegative than copper, so there would be no reaction. This would only happen on the surface of the heatsink as well, so I don't know how effective this would be at increasing the heat transferred to the heatsink.
 

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Who makes a silver heatsink? Must cost as much as water cooling...
 

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I think DD did a silver block... I dunno they might still have it on there, but it was about $120 for it.

Here we go: http://www.dangerdenstore.com/home.php?cat=22

6 blocks made by DD from silver, they say the blocks are 99.995% Pure Silver!

and this link shows how much better silver is than copper for transferring heat.. not much, but it IS better.
 

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Quote:
n terms of conductivity its copper silver gold platinum

and it probably wasn't a pure silver screw driver. It was most likely a silver alloy on the outside, I could try to explain details but i know more about organic reactions
No, wrong, you're confusing electricity with heat. Best conductors of heat are:

Diamond > Silver > Copper > Aluminum. Silver != Aluminum. Silver and copper are close, however Diamond is by far the best conductor of heat.
 

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Electroplating which is what your doing will not increase the heat transfer of a Hs. The reason why is when you electroplate it is with two dissimilar metals having different thermal conductive properties. When the film forms on the Hs no matter how thin it is it will impede heat transfer due to the different thermal properties of the metals. Its just like putting a fresh coat of paint on the bottom of your Hs. You are effectively thickening the base of the heatsink which in and of itself will decrease heat transfer. The silver may absorbe the heat a small fraction more but it still has to dissipate it through the rest of the Hs to get rid of it. I hope this helps some. We actually tried electroplating the control rods of a reactor once with cesium to help control neutron absorption at below critical levels only to find out it acted more like a insulator of heat and the control rods overheated some. Also the plating only happens to the outside of the screwdriver. In order for it to plate the whole way through the screwdriver would have to be porous enough for the fluid carrying the aqueous copper to flow inside of it. Then it would only coat the surface area it comes in contact with.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by dex100

more than your house


Actually artificial diamond seems to be feasible from a monetary stand point
But I don't think you can create diamond that big.
 

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You mean silver in colour aka aluminum?

Silver heatsinks arent around, because it would only help a few C in temps over copper, and cost extreme ammounts of money. Silver waterblocks are around though, but they only work a few C better than copper.
 
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