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ubuntu 20 How to make bootable usb from Windows 10 iso file efi

431 Views 10 Replies 4 Participants Last post by  crowhigh
Hello guys. It's been years since I've installed ubuntu. But not a whole lot has changed. Except that I'm using usb to install windows instead of cdr's or dvdr's. Problem I'm having is: I installed ubuntu, then I was going to install windows and use BC EDIT to fix the boot loader so I can duel boot. Now with efi etc and usb. I can't figure out what program I can use to make the bootable usb , bootable with the windows 10 iso I got directly from microsoft.
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I use the Windows Media Creation Tool, as it's the only way I've found 100% of the time on 100% of the systems I've used it on that Windows will install with no problems. I've had a couple of boxes (out of something like four dozen, to be fair) have odd issues installing (can't find SSD, hangs on formatting SSD) with either a straight burn of the ISO or using a multi-ISO tool.

Unless you have a pathological hatred of GRUB, I'd recommend one of two ways:
1) The minimum pain route.
2) The "hope Windows behaves itself" route.

Route 1 involves using two separate SSDs; one for Windows, one for Linux. Disconnect the one destined for Linux. Install Windows on the other (this is so Windows doesn't pull the stupid-arse trick of installing its EFI partition on the non-target-C SSD, which is does by default for some inane reason). Update it, install drivers, make sure it's happy, etc etc. Shut down, reconnect the SSD for Linux, boot from Linux USB, install to blank SSD (and make sure the Linux bootloader is on that SSD as well). Update Linux, reboot, set Linux SSD as default bootloader in the UEFI BIOS. Windows will be listed in GRUB, which you can select as you desire. But, importantly, Windows isn't sharing EFI partition ownership with another OS, which it will occasionally decide to nuke (because Windows doesn't play well with others).

Route 2 involves hoping that Windows doesn't pull it's "nuke the competition from the EFI partition" trick (which it does on a semi-regular basis). Format the drive up using parted or something similar into a 512MB EFI partition (marked as EFI System Partition), whatever partition you want for Windows (unformatted) and the partition you want for Linux (which you will temporarily format to ext4 so that Windows ignores it). Install Windows to the partition you want Windows on, reboot to bootable Linux. Delete ext4 partition and install Linux, using the same EFI system partition. Reboot. Pray every time you get a Windows update that it doesn't decide to go "There Can Only Be One!" on the EFI partition.
 

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Intel 4670k, 12 gb of ddr3. 3 ssd 500 mb/s. wx 4100 4gb radeon.
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guys. But I couldn't get it to work. Windows would not allow me have extra partitions. I'm gonna have to use vmware or something to run ubuntu in windows unless I get more blue screens.
 

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Thanks guys. But I couldn't get it to work. Windows would not allow me have extra partitions. I'm gonna have to use vmware or something to run ubuntu in windows unless I get more blue screens.
Which is exactly why I said do not rely on the Windows bootloader. Although if Windows is already installed and has swallowed the whole drive, you will need to shrink the partition using the Disk Management tool in Windows, or risk NTFS freaking out.
 

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You really do seem to be out to make life much more difficult than it needs to be? Windows does not like admitting other operating systems exist. Asking Windows to handle multi-boot scenarios is a world of pain in convenient 512MB EFI portions. As I've already said above, just use GRUB (either with the two OSes on two SSDs, or if you're feeling brave both on one SSD does work OK, it's just dependent on Windows not deciding it knows better than you) and you'll save yourself hours of effort.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I got it wrong. I didn't mean bcd edit. I meant easy bcd. I used to use it all the time with xp pro and vista. Even windows 7.

The home version is free, none commercial use. Easy bcd
 

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Just use GRUB.

There are a lot of guides online for dual booting Windows 10 and Ubuntu, although many are now severely out of date. This one isn't too bad, although it isn't precisely the route I follow.
 
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