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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys. I just recently replaced my AsRock Z77 Extreme4 to an Asus P8Z77-V due to issues with the AsRock. I installed the Asus in and attempted to overclock using the Ivy Bridge overclocking guide for Asus motherboards as well as the AsRock overclocking guide which I used before. My issue is that I can't get my 3570K to run prime for even 30 minutes without BSOD @ 4.7GHz even if the vcore is at 1.4v. With my AsRock I was able to get 4.7GHz stable 24/7 @ 1.37v. This is just disappointing as I would think the Asus would be able to produce the same results as I am using the same CPU/Memory.

Is there anything that could be causing this? I get numerous BSODs mostly "increase vcore" types according to the BSOD list on the guide but as I've said 1.4v is already way higher than what I previously ran with my AsRock board. I am still using offset mode though as advised in the AsRock guide as supposed to the Asus guide which suggests using Manual. I plan on doing this when I have time but I am still unsure if this will make a difference.

I refuse to believe that the Asus board cannot overclock as good as the AsRock board. Please tell me this isn't the case.
 

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I think I remember reading certain AsRock boards report really inaccurate voltages. Unless you tested with a multimeter, your "1.37v" could've been A LOT higher. Even the Asus voltage reading might be a little off.
 
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ASRock Z77 voltages are off on average by 0.04v from real values. You should be stable at 1.41v. Worst case they can be as much as 0.1v off from real values.

Here is the thread.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeXel View Post

ASRock Z77 voltages are off on average by 0.04v from real values. You should be stable at 1.41v. Worst case they can be as much as 0.1v off from real values.

Here is the thread.
Thanks again DeXel. Is this in general among ALL AsRock boards? Was this never fixed in any Bios updates? Also, I'm assuming CPU-Z and other monitoring tools based the readings off of the board so they would all show incorrect values? This makes sense since I was able to get it sort of stable on 1.41v but I never would have pushed my 3570k to 1.4+v in the first place. Another way my AsRock board screwed me. Oh well I guess I'll lower my clock to 4.6 then and see how it goes.
frown.gif


Edit: So the Asus boards would be showing the correct values then? Only AsRock has this issue?
 

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All Z77 that use Intersil PWM which are almost all of them (OC Formula is one of those that's not). ASRock never acknowledged the issue to fix it even though their own OC flagship board (OC Formula) required more voltage than Extreme series.

Asus is much closer to real values. DMM values are usually within 0.01-0.02v of measurements of most boards.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeXel View Post

All Z77 that use Intersil PWM which are almost all of them (OC Formula is one of those that's not). ASRock never acknowledged the issue to fix it even though their own OC flagship board (OC Formula) required more voltage than Extreme series.

Asus is much closer to real values. DMM values are usually within 0.01-0.02v of measurements of most boards.
Good to know, pretty dangerous considering people might think they are below vcore threshold when they are actually above it. Another minus point for AsRock boards. I guess I was actually running on 1.42v-1.43v the whole time. :| Gonna try and get 4.6GHz stable on lower vcore now and see how it goes. I hope false readings is what is really causing the issue rather than any factor related to the board. I'm loving the Asus board so far, from the looks how it didn't present a single issue when setting it up. I remember a ton of Dr. Debug errors on my Extreme4 and a bunch of reseating before I got it to work the first time.
 

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when i used to use Asus boards, i always had to use a little more voltage than normal, Have no idea why but ALL boards are never correct with reporting voltage not even the ROG boards.

as stated above the best way to find out is a good multi meter.

when it BSOD what codes are you getting? this will help pin point what area needs more voltage
 
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