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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
haha i know this sounds incredibly far fetched but what if you could seal your computer in a vacuum and fill it with a gas with a very low freezing point and just hook a refrigerating unit to it to get rid of the condensation problem lol. Or heck, use a refrigerant and have the entire case as your 'expansion area' and run a always-on compressor. Im sure you could devise ways of sealing off areas for USB stuff and cd roms and such... haha i bet theres a million reasons why this couldnt work but ya never know, anyone wanna enlighten me?
 

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i saw your post erlier, but i have no clue what and how to do that....
 

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How about just a sealed box with the mobo in it, and have an a/c blowing in. There is a guy at ExtremeOverclocking that did just that, along with a couple simple mods to the ac, and his ambient temps are sub-zero. That would be a helluva lot easier
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Veto1024
How did he do it without turning the air into water and frying everything?
Since the box was totally sealed, no condensation occured. Condensation happens when your components are colder than the ambient(room or case) temperature. Since the ambient temp inside the box is really cold, and the compenents are warmer, no condensation
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Condensation happens when the air drops below freezing and the water molecules in the air liquify. Sub zero ambient temperatures would mean that unless the sealed chamber was pumped of air, the water in the air would liquify and well, all your stuff would get wet
. I think what he meant was sub-room temperature
 

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yeh, but about the vacuum, you would have to have liquid cooling because without a substance inside to transfer the heat to you would fry in seconds.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well itd pump some sort of gas into it to facilitate the heat transfer from the cold pipes to the heatsinks or hell, make the refrigerant gas the actual gas inside the tower. The whole case would be the 'expansion area'.

Oh and im a physicist in training so
to u dang engineers. U guys can... go build a car... but i can blow u all up with my bombs
 

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lol, ok then, but can you teach me how to blow things up after you're done with the car?
 

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the air conditioning unit must be rated at being able to cool more wattage than the power consumption of your PC. Say 200 watts of heat, = 600 BTU?

as for the gas, naturally carbon dioxide. it is readily available (walmart), denser than air (so it can absorb and carry off more heat), and it has no liquid form (only a gas or solid).

the problem is that you still need great air cooling inside your case... assuming you are using air cooling... if you have a poor cpu heatsink/fan, it simply wont be able to give off very much heat, no matter what your setup.

Think of it like this: you are merely lowering the ambient case temperature from around 34deg to say 18deg, this increases the efficiency of your CPU HSF, but it wont work miracles with a sub-par heatsink/fan.
 

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Wouldn't you need an outtake and intake fan still? Or would that not be required since the AC and heatsink work in sync.
 

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right they work in synch, the heatsink pulls the heat from the CPU, and the lower ambient temp accelerates the heat transfer from the heatsink to the air. if you had an intake and exhaust fan, you would blow just about all your cool air out. the inside needs to be semi airtight. remember the thermal transfer for the fridge occurs outside of the unit, on the condensing coil. there is no need to move air thru the inside of the fridge.
 
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Quote:

Originally Posted by kevinb70
right they work in synch, the heatsink pulls the heat from the CPU, and the lower ambient temp accelerates the heat transfer from the heatsink to the air. if you had an intake and exhaust fan, you would blow just about all your cool air out. the inside needs to be semi airtight. remember the thermal transfer for the fridge occurs outside of the unit, on the condensing coil. there is no need to move air thru the inside of the fridge.
Thank you! I understand completely now. Thanks for the help in your explanation.
 

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My science teacher at school always used to tell us that a proper vacuum would have several hundred tons of pressure. Therefor your motherboard would be squished
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by xms
My science teacher at school always used to tell us that a proper vacuum would have several hundred tons of pressure. Therefor your motherboard would be squished
It could only be squished if it contained air, unless you are talking about the box it was contained in. But atmospheric pressure at sea level is 14.7 PSI, right? So I am not clear on the hundreds of tons of pressure... .2K tons would be 400,000 lbs meaning @ sea level the container would need to have about 26,700 sqr in of surface. As a cube that would be about 30" a side...pretty big case.

At any rate, the easiest way to do it would be to take the exhaust duct from an A/C unit and run it to a box. Then you would need to have an exhaust port on the box that led back to the A/C unit so that it was a closed loop. Problem is you would still get condensation on the OUTSIDE of the box so you have to have some kind of water reclamation. I said it in another thread...if you are really obsessed with COLD temps, plunk the $400-500 on a frost-free freezer, drill a few holes in the side for wire access (great stuff them in place) and put the whole rig in the freezer...w/o the side panels of course. You would still need fans on HS's but it would do the deed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by xms
My science teacher at school always used to tell us that a proper vacuum would have several hundred tons of pressure. Therefor your motherboard would be squished
Your science teacher was an idiot then.
 

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My dad is a HVAC tech and does alot of refigeration stuff as well. I actually asked him about this very concept. He had built a small freever for a hospitol that ran -75c. He said he would make me one for 5000$. That would be a little too cold. But he can make thing a little warmer too. He also has dehumidifing things to to deal with condensation.
 
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