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It depends on the processor and the technology integrated into it, as well as the specific type of sleep selected in BIOS. Some sleep modes merely turn off most of the peripherals and stops execution on the CPU, others go as far as dumping all CPU data and states to memory and turning the chip off almost entirely.

S1 sleep state flushes the CPU caches and stops execution. The CPU and main system memory remain powered, but other devices that don't need to be on are turned off.
S2 sleep dumps the caches to main system memory and turns off the CPU.
S3 is sleep mode proper, and generally by this point the only things still with power in the system are the memory (which may be set to run at a slower rate and lower voltage to further reduce power consumption) and the memory controller wherever it is to maintain DRAM data.
S4 is hibernate, where DRAM data is saved to disk, a flag set to resume from disk, then all silicon in-system powered down.

If your sleep mode in BIOS is set to S1, in theory the voltage should be maintained depending on the CState and power settings. If it's set to S3, then no, voltage is not maintained as the CPU is entirely off by that point.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyrious View Post

It depends on the processor and the technology integrated into it, as well as the specific type of sleep selected in BIOS. Some sleep modes merely turn off most of the peripherals and stops execution on the CPU, others go as far as dumping all CPU data and states to memory and turning the chip off almost entirely.

S1 sleep state flushes the CPU caches and stops execution. The CPU and main system memory remain powered, but other devices that don't need to be on are turned off.
S2 sleep dumps the caches to main system memory and turns off the CPU.
S3 is sleep mode proper, and generally by this point the only things still with power in the system are the memory (which may be set to run at a slower rate and lower voltage to further reduce power consumption) and the memory controller wherever it is to maintain DRAM data.
S4 is hibernate, where DRAM data is saved to disk, a flag set to resume from disk, then all silicon in-system powered down.

If your sleep mode in BIOS is set to S1, in theory the voltage should be maintained depending on the CState and power settings. If it's set to S3, then no, voltage is not maintained as the CPU is entirely off by that point.[/quote

Thank you for the fast response i didnt know i coukd set that up in bios, guess i didnt think about it since i just adjust the sleep time for everything in windows. My system specs are exactly what i have listed for my rig
 
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