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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As you read, its for a CAR amp:rolleyes:... Now im not worried about any part of this because after some research its possible, and is done quite a bit... What im worried about is how or what would you mount it to... OR my idea is running just copper tubes through the amp in airspace above the equipment enough to cool it down...

it seems everyone is showing the pumps and the radiator, big whoop to me, they never show the inside of an AMP and what they connect it to, if anything...

I cant think of anything you could attach a "heat sink" to ...
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Not worried about the pump, loop, resiviour i just don't know what to connect or how to connect it to the actually amp physically, or if it even has to touch anything or can it just be run around it, using the cold water to cool the internal temps down...
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Also would using pure 100 % anti freeze work, since this is a car and there will be winters etc, dont want any freezing if at all possible

Ive been contacted to do this custom for someone, and if he likes it i could get a lot of cash doing it.
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Any help would be nice i know this is for PC's but i figured we could pool our brains together and get something done !
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Ill send pictures if i can just so we can say that we water cooled an AMP !
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ttaylor0024;15259668
It shouldn't be too hard really. You will have to mix up some TIM with superglue though to get the block to stick down, and you most likely wont be able to remove it after it sets.

Anti-freeze will be fine to run in there too.
Not sure the first part sounds like a great idea, rather try some ceramite/epoxy eque TIM's, such as ASTA-7G, its for permanent application and STICKS on their.

I'm not really certain WHERE to stick it to but if you think about the way an amp works, I would think somewhere like its powerboard? Haha hell I don't know, google an amp diagram or run the amp and touch it places to see what's hot
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Good luck!
-GA
 

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I had a 560 watt kicker amp go on me so I decided to open it up and see if it was fixable. If you open the amp up the metal casing is the heatsink and only touches the mosfets which in my amp were along the edges. They are quite large, probably the size of 4-6 mosfets in a pc. You could possibly try its either ek or enzotech's little 30mm waterblocks. They might work. Its really a neat idea.

*edit im sorry its alphacool and they're 15mm http://www.performance-pcs.com/catalog/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=59_971_294&products_id=30145
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thats what i was thinking was hitting the capasitors in the amp, looking at some of these drawings there is about 10-20 of these, they are huge compared to a computer, no big deal and i may sound like a noob here but ive never really thought about it,

what if i fabricate ( because i know people who do this already and do it professionaly) a large heatsink, and hell even use some thermal paste on the tops of the capasitors, but would this short it out, im not sure if electricity actually goes through them, IE touching the tops of 2 seperate capasitors. ( i know i sound very dumb, i know the electricity goes through it, but if i touch them will the pass through )

I can find all sorts of pictures of people showing the setup, they never show whats actually connecting the loop to the AMP... Its quite frustrating.

Also like you suggest how the hell am i going to attach this and make it stick and have contact when the subs are going off... The guy who wants me to do this makes his own boxes for a shop on ebay and typicaly makes 18 + inch subs etc. He wins all the time around here on the compitions, so im worried about vibration.

Good ideas and discussion but keep it going !

http://www.google.com/imgres?q=inside+a+large+amp&um=1&hl=en&sa=N&biw=1024&bih=614&tbm=isch&tbnid=kJUc-3BOrydSBM:&imgrefurl=http://www.tnt-audio.com/ampli/norma-ipa60r_e.html&docid=qTWkSIwpfiD-dM&w=283&h=184&ei=yWiUToqPMfSnsALPztXvAQ&zoom=1&iact=rc&dur=94&page=6&tbnh=98&tbnw=150&start=76&ndsp=15&ved=1t:429,r:7,s:76&tx=81&ty=36

Is what im looking at attaching it to ( the blue "things" - capasitors ?), and wonder if it will short if i create a heatsink to cover and contact every single one of these. - Prob a noob attemp but this is why im asking for help in the firstplace.
 

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No the caps are not what you have to cool down. If you look at any pc water cooling block either motherboard or gpu they only cool the processor, memory if needed, and mosfets/vrms. If you open up an amp you will only need to cool what the heatsink is attached to which 99% of the time is must the mosfets. Ill try to find my amp in mya storage unit and take some pics.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
So how big are the mosfets, are they able to run a single 4mmx4mmx4mm block on them ?

Plus if im going to that small of tubing, ill need a long adapter with at the start the standard or bigger tubing, and have it branch into the small tubes, any idea where to get one that fits the 4x4x4 size heatsinks tubing size.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fishinfan;15256574
I have seen water cooling done in a car amp before back a few years ago in a Car Audio magazine.
this. I also remeber it.
I think some small blocks were used. Like ones used for vrms.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Mind explaining what a VRMS is ?

im getting pumped to do this
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sorry for asking all this, i plan plan plan, then plan some more, and i measure about 15 times not 2 times... so .... yea
 

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voltage regulator module
A voltage regulator module or VRM, sometimes called PPM (processor power module), is a buck converter that provides a microprocessor the appropriate supply voltage, converting +5 V or +12 V to a much lower voltage required by the CPU. Some are soldered to the motherboard while others are installed in an open slot. It allows processors with different supply voltage to be mounted on the same motherboard. Most modern CPUs require less than 1.5 volts. CPU designers tend to design to smaller CPU core voltages; lower voltages help reduce CPU power dissipation, often referred to as TDP or Thermal Design Power

Some voltage regulators provide a fixed supply voltage to the processor, but most of them sense the required supply voltage from the processor, essentially acting as a continuously-variable resistor. In particular, VRMs that are soldered to the motherboard are supposed to do the sensing, according to the Intel specification.

The correct supply voltage is communicated by the microprocessor to the VRM at startup via a number of bits called VID (voltage identificator). In particular, the VRM initially provides a standard supply voltage to the VID logic, which is the part of the processor whose only aim is to then send the VID to the VRM. When the VRM has received the VID identifying the required supply voltage, it starts acting as a voltage regulator, providing the required constant voltage supply to the processor.

Modern GPUs also use VRM due to a need of more power and high current.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I think im ready to do this, i just need to get the amp from him so i can get a shopping list for him, i think depending on what i find produces the most heat is what will get water-cooled.

Still looking for a converter for the tube size that begins where the pump is, down to a small enough size that will fit on the water-blocks that were mentioned earlier in the post.
 

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Mate you need to do a bit of read-up about basic electronics before you hook up a waterblock and shortcircuit the amp... :/
 
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