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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been reading a few basic tutorials, and I recently purchased a copy of "operating system concepts 7th edition". Reading it though I am finding myself already lost quite quickly. I think I need a more basic starting point before I can get into the really technical stuff. Anybody have a suggestion of a good online tutorial, or a good book that will stop to explain in detail and simply how the operating system works? I don't want to know how to use my operating system (particularly windows), because I already get that. I want to understand it instead. Any suggestions would be great.
 

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Do you know what an operating system is in its simplest terms?

Locking and racing conditions are topics to study as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I understand what an operating system does. Manages system resources, provides user access to hardware resources, ect. I don't really know how it does it. Truthfully, I don't know where to start. I have read a few guide on the internet, this one most recently:

http://www.linux-tutorial.info/modul...ntent&pageid=1

I am through "introduction to operating systems" and know trying to make heads or tails of the linux knowledge it provides. I am not exclusively interested in linux though. I find unix, DOS, windows, and Solaris interesting too. I primarily want to learn about linux and windows.
 

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What do you want more detail about?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well in short... pretty much everything. Process managment, file systems, hardware functions, ect. ect. I know the basic stuff pretty well, and even some intermediate ideas also. I ended up getting a set of video lectures to accompany "Modern Operating System Concepts 7th" which has helped a lot. Still, more sources wouldn't be bad either. The book rapidly covers in about twenty pages much stuff I have never been exposed to yet. I guess I want a intermediate level tech book on everything an OS does.

I am also really interested as to what happens at the individual hardware level, particularily on processors and device controllers. The book I am reading doesn't go into detail about that.
 

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First of all, I would recommend to start coding all kind of things and you will learn a lot and by the way, that is really important skill.
 

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Did you read up on thread management and resource contention? (i.e. Dining Philosophers, Sleeping Barber problems)
 

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I would recommend this book. A+ Guide to software For me it has been a very comprehensive guide to what is going on within the OS. It doesn't take a very in depth look at Linux but it does go into pretty good detail about MS DOS and Windows. It is also our text for the Operating Systems class I am currently in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
So should I learn operating system theory or coding first? I eventually wanted to move on to learning DOS and Unix commands, but I figured that I should look into general theory first so I better understand what is happening.

Which books what people recommend on coding, and which coding languages? My operating system concepts books recommends a knowledge of Java and C++ I think.... so good books about that? In truth, good books or online tutorials on anything is great.

@Duckie I am interested in that sort of stuff very much, however, I am not familiar with those terms you listed. I actually know very little about threading, although I have read up some on scheduling and process management.
 

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One of my buddies was a computer science major in college, and one of their classes involved writing an operating system--VERY BASIC mind you...not sure what you have access to, but if you can get ahold of a college comp sci book, it might help.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by mothergoose729 View Post
So should I learn operating system theory or coding first? I eventually wanted to move on to learning DOS and Unix commands, but I figured that I should look into general theory first so I better understand what is happening.

Which books what people recommend on coding, and which coding languages? My operating system concepts books recommends a knowledge of Java and C++ I think.... so good books about that? In truth, good books or online tutorials on anything is great.

@Duckie I am interested in that sort of stuff very much, however, I am not familiar with those terms you listed. I actually know very little about threading, although I have read up some on scheduling and process management.

If you want to learn about the OS specifically, you should cover theory first.

Here's some quick Wiki articles on some OS problems:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleeping_barber_problem
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dining_...ophers_problem
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cigarette_smokers_problem
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Readers-writers_problem

You can then write basic programs that create these problems and then create fixes for them. From what I recall, that was probably half of my OS Theory class.
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Having no experience with coding, what do I need to learn after reading up on these problems to create a solution?
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by mothergoose729
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Having no experience with coding, what do I need to learn after reading up on these problems to create a solution?

Oh... practice coding then.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by mothergoose729 View Post
BUMP

Come on guys, nobody has read up academically on OS?
Just goto Amazon.com and pick your OS flavor (there's so many books there on academic computing -- including exotic topics -- that you're bound to find exactly what you need to read).

Spent days there just searching C++ manuals and linear/interger algebra books (so crucial in learning 3D animation).
 

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Lurk on the lkml for a month. You'll then have a much better idea of what you want to know and how you might need to go about it.
 
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