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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i am thinking of building my own water cooling and i am a little worried about the leaks?How can i be sure that i wont wash my system?
first of all i will set it to be outside of the case.I'm thinking of making it some kind of independant case.What would you recomend me doing to make it leak safe.
thx
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by B8EN8

i am thinking of building my own water cooling and i am a little worried about the leaks?How can i be sure that i wont wash my system?
first of all i will set it to be outside of the case.I'm thinking of making it some kind of independant case.What would you recomend me doing to make it leak safe.
thx

To make it safe you can set it up without attaching the blocks to your components and have it run about 24hrs and check for leaks then.

If you make an independent case it wont help you at all against leaks because you would still have hoses going into your computer to cool the CPU/GPU/Chipset.
 

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Also, by using De-ionised water (or Fluid XP) you greatly reduce the chance of damaging your system if there was a leak, as these are not very conductive, and will not cause a short in your system.
 

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If you take the time to leak test and set up your components properly, then the chances of a leak are very minimal. For the number of people that are watercooling these days, I have seen very few leaks. And those that I have seen have been caused by user error. Just take your time and do it right and you will not have any problems.
 

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just do like lando said take time and check all the components and there wont b any leaks

unless ur unlucky enough to buy a faulty/taiwan/chinese kit
(lol they really make em)
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by xms

Also, by using De-ionised water (or Fluid XP) you greatly reduce the chance of damaging your system if there was a leak, as these are not very conductive, and will not cause a short in your system.

Just to clarify (yeah, I'm picky), yes deionized or distilled water are poor conductors...but they do still conduct, thus they can still cause a "short", otherwise people wouldn't WP their systems when runnig chillers and/or TEC's since condensation may show up. Now the Fluid XP is listed as non-conductive which of course means it will not conduct electricity, in which case yes, a leak would not be devastating.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Where can i get that Fluid XP from?
 

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... did I scare you man ... I'm sorry

Mine yes did leak... but since my comp was off I let it sit for 5 days and NOW TODAY I HAVE A FULLY FUNCTIONALL WATERCOOLED COMPUTER

and mine is in an external encloser.... a GSA trefoils box haha courtesy of my little sister

but I am up and fully operational
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by Bindusar

Just to clarify (yeah, I'm picky), yes deionized or distilled water are poor conductors...but they do still conduct, thus they can still cause a "short", otherwise people wouldn't WP their systems when runnig chillers and/or TEC's since condensation may show up. Now the Fluid XP is listed as non-conductive which of course means it will not conduct electricity, in which case yes, a leak would not be devastating.

Then whats a good conductive liquid thats cheap? I don't care about leaks since I'm going to run this in and old system.. any ideas?
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by Lando95

If you take the time to leak test and set up your components properly, then the chances of a leak are very minimal. For the number of people that are watercooling these days, I have seen very few leaks. And those that I have seen have been caused by user error. Just take your time and do it right and you will not have any problems.

This is about the best advice you can be given. Follow it and take your time. You will be fine and once you have it done you are in the club
neeyedsm
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by Lando95

If you take the time to leak test and set up your components properly, then the chances of a leak are very minimal. For the number of people that are watercooling these days, I have seen very few leaks. And those that I have seen have been caused by user error. Just take your time and do it right and you will not have any problems.

2 water cooled systems going for 2 years and 1 year and no leaks
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by ShawnMcGrail

Then whats a good conductive liquid thats cheap? I don't care about leaks since I'm going to run this in and old system.. any ideas?

First let me say this, if you take your time, properly teflon tape or plumber's dope your fittings and install everything carefully to ensure no cross threading, the likelyhood of a leak is VERY slim. I have probably screwed in at least a couple thousand fittings and pipe plugs in my day and the ones that leaked did so because either the threads were bad (cut with a dull tap or die) or I didn't tighten it sufficiently. The hose clamps are another one that you need to take your time with. You can actually cut the hose by over tightening the clamp, so don't think you need to gorilla things down,,,you don't, especially since we aren't working with high PSI. If a leak occurs it will likelyy not be obvious, I would expect it to be a VERY slow, tiny leak So when you test the system outside the case I would say you should leave it run for at least a couple days. Another thing that might sound strange, if you can take one of those small portable heaters and place it close to you testing circuit so that you can heat it up, this would be a great thing to do. This will simulate the heat loads the system will see and thus cause expansion and contraction of the blocks, allowing an simulated true scenario run. Leave it circulate for at least a couple days, turning the heater ON and OFF for at least half a day at a time to promote that expand/contract condition. If any, the leaks will likely be very small and will take time to ,anifest into something you can see.

Now...good conductive cheam fluid...distilled or de-ioned water with some water wetter to help stabilize it.
 
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