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<b><span style="font-size:24px;">Choosing the Correct Water Cooling Pump</span><br></b><span style="font-size:12px;"><i>A guide by charliehorse55</i></span><br><br><br><br><br><span style="font-size:16px;"><b>What flow rate do I need in my loop for the best performance?</b></span><br>
Most loops achieve maximal efficiency around 1.0 GPM. Increasing the flow rate beyond this point as little to no effect on temperature for most modern blocks, and the extra heat dump from the added pumps required to reach higher flow rates can actually have a larger impact than the increase in flow. This is because the heat capacity of water is incredibly high. At 1.0 GPM of flow, it takes over 250W of heat to raise the water a single degree.<br><a class="spoiler-link H-spoiler-toggle" href="#"><strong>Math</strong> <span class="spoiler-help">(Click to show)</span></a><div class="spoiler-hidden"><br>
Heat capacity of water = 4187j per kg<br>
1.0 GPM of flow in litters per second = 0.063 kg/second<br>
4187j*0.063 kg/second<br><br>
A joule is 1 watt for 1 second, so the units of time cancel out:<br><br>
4187W * 0.063 kg = 264W<br><br>
264W to raise a 1.0 GPM flow of water by a single degree</div>
<br>
Let's assume you are running a CPU + dual GPU loop. With a heat dump of around 200W per component, the last component in the loop will have the water entering the block at 1.5C higher than the first. If you increased your flow rate to 2.0 GPM, this would drop to 0.75C, lowering the GPU temperature by 0.75C. This is not a huge gain, but it is appreciable, until you factor in the added heat dump from the pump. To get to 2.0 GPM on a dual GPU + CPU loop you would need to add another 30W of pump at a minimum. Even with a quad radiator, this is going to increase your water-air delta by about 0.2-0.5C, effectively raising the temperature of <i>all</i> of your blocks by that much. All of a sudden these small gains become absolutely meaningless.<br><br><b><span style="font-size:16px;">If the heat capacity of water is so high, why can't I have less than 1.0 GPM?</span></b><br>
At low flow rates, the performance of your water blocks drops dramatically as the flow inside of them switches from turbulent to laminar. Turbulent flow occurs when a lot of water is going through a small pipe. When water is flowing this way, it creates random vortices that ensure the water is constantly mixing, and that fresh, cold water is constantly touching the waterblock. If the flow rate is low enough, the water switches to flowing in a laminar way. When water flows in this way, it does not mix as much, and the water on the edges may be significantly warmer than the water around it. This is bad for performance, as heat is not transferred away from the block as quickly.<br><br><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2572388/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2572388" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2572388/flags/LL" style="; width: 323px; height: 243px"></a><br><br>
Older water-cooling equipment used very open blocks with large openings for water passing through, making it very easy for a laminar flow to develop. This is why so many older blocks are incredibly flow dependent, requiring high flow rates to get good results. Modern blocks use very small channels, so that turbulent flow occurs at much lower flow. Almost all waterblocks today are designed to have turbulent flow at low flow rates, and as such the temperature gains from higher flow rates have largely disappeared. Most blocks will continue to perform down to about 0.6-0.7 GPM, but it's a good idea to have around 1.0 GPM to have some headroom.<br><br><b><span style="font-size:16px;">How do I know which pump I need to achieve 1 GPM?</span></b><br>
Pumps are rated on a pressure/flow curve. At lower flow rates, they can produce more pressure, and at higher flow rates, less pressure. The blocks in your loop provide restriction that scales in the opposite direction, as higher flow rates lead to a greater pressure difference being required. The flow rate of your loop is determined by the intersection of these two lines:<br><br><a class="H-lightbox-open" href="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2571917/"><img alt="" class="lightbox-enabled" data-id="2571917" data-type="61" src="http://www.overclock.net/content/type/61/id/2571917/width/600/height/1000/flags/LL" style="; width: 600px; height: 261px"></a><br><br>
A more detailed explanation of this graph <a class="bbcode_url" href="http://www.xtremerigs.net/2013/08/09/how-to-read-a-pressureflowrestriction-plot/" target="_blank">can be found on xtremerigs</a>.<br><br><b><span style="font-size:16px;">Can't you simplify this?</span></b><br>
Yes. You don't have to find the exact intersection of those two lines because you don't need to know the exact flow rate of your loop. You just have to make sure that is greater than 1 GPM. You can add up the pressure drop created by our components at 1 GPM, and then make sure you have a pump capable of that pressure at 1 GPM. Finding the right pump becomes as simple as adding up a few numbers!<br><br>
I've made a rough guide to get a general idea of how much pumping power you need. The data on the pumps is deadly accurate, however as there are many, many different types of blocks it would be mundane to list all of the pressure drops (and there isn't data available for everything!). Feel free to substitute any value in the first chart with ones specific to your parts. (You can find this data on review websites).<br><br>
First, add up the restriction of your loop (these values are safe averages)<br><br><b>Pressure Drop figures for components</b><br>
Radiators: 0.25 PSI each (the size of the radiator has no real effect)<br>
CPU Block: 0.9 PSI<br>
GPU block: 0.9 PSI<br>
Motherboard block: 2.0 PSI (fullcover)<br>
Fittings: Negligible (An extreme setup with 10+ 90 deg fittings might add 0.5 PSI in total)<br>
Tubing: 0.5 PSI per 10 feet for 3/8" ID, negligible for 1/2" ID.<br>
Reservoir: Negligible<br><br>
If you run your GPU blocks in parallel, divide the PSI drop by the number of blocks, so if you have 3 blocks in parallel you would only add 0.3 PSI to the total.<br><br><b>*Exceptions*</b><br>
HW Labs GTX Radiators are around 0.7 PSI each<br>
Anything by aquacomputer is about double the normal pressure drop<br><br>
Now that you have the total pressure drop for your loop, find a pump that can handle at least that much pressure at 1 GPM of flow.<br><br><b>Maximum Head Pressure at 1.0 GPM</b><br><br>
Iwaki RD-30: 13.72 PSI<br>
MCP50X Stock: 6.54 PSI<br>
MCP35X Stock: 6.52 PSI<br>
MCP355 + Top: 6.14 PSI<br>
MCP655 + Top: 4.95 PSI<br>
MCP655 Stock: 4.72 PSI<br>
MCP355 Stock: 4.63 PSI<br>
MCP350 + Top: 4.48 PSI<br>
DCP 4.0 Stock: 3.83 PSI<br>
XSPC 750: 3.59 PSI<br>
655-B + EK Top: 3.38 PSI<br>
MCP350: 3.25 PSI<br>
655-B Stock: 3.23 PSI<br>
DCP 2.6: 2.55 PSI<br>
Eheim 1250: 2.41 PSI<br>
DCP 2.2: 2.08 PSI<br>
Eheim 1048: 1.78<br>
Eheim 1046: 1.02 PSI<br><br><br>
Double pump setups are usually almost exactly double the performance of a single pump. Keep in mind, you should also choose your pump based on how loud it is, how much power it uses and how it will fit into your case. This is merely a guide to help you choose a pump that is powerful enough to handle your loop.<br><br>
Feel free to ask anything, I will clear up any questions you may have and potentially add it to this post.
 

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Can't wait to read this, sub'd also.
 

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Well, now you've let the hype set into people's hearts... make sure you deliver <img alt="biggrin.gif" class="bbcode_smiley" src="http://files.overclock.net/images/smilies/biggrin.gif">
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Done.
 

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This is exactly what everyone just getting into watercooling needs to read(me). I didn't feel confident with my setup up until this very moment.<br><br>
Great work! this needs to be stickied<br><br>
+rep
 

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Super. You should add the Aquacomputer/Eheim and Iwaki pumps to the list, since some enthusiasts do use those. <img alt="wink.gif" class="bbcode_smiley" src="http://files.overclock.net/images/smilies/wink.gif"> I have also asked Juggalo23451 to determine sticky eligibility; he will be responsible for making it so in that case.
 

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What are the restrictions on RAM and Mobo blocks?<br>
This is very informative. Awesome work
 

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lovely! :)<br><br>
Nice work with this, I know more about pumps now! <img alt="biggrin.gif" class="bbcode_smiley" src="http://files.overclock.net/images/smilies/biggrin.gif">
 

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Discussion Starter #13
<div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Chunky_Chimp;14815486</strong> <br>
Super. You should add the Aquacomputer/Eheim and Iwaki pumps to the list, since some enthusiasts do use those. <img alt="wink.gif" class="bbcode_smiley" src="http://files.overclock.net/images/smilies/wink.gif"> I have also asked Juggalo23451 to determine sticky eligibility; he will be responsible for making it so in that case.</div>
</div>
<br>
Added.<br><br>
Iwaki RD-30 = 13.72 PSI<br>
Eheim 1250 = 2.41 PSI<br>
Eheim 1048 = 1.78<br>
Eheim 1046 = 1.02 PSI<br><br>
The Eheim pumps weren't really designed for watercooling, more for aquarium pumping so they have a very low pressure but high flow.<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Nexus6;14815506</strong> <br>
What are the restrictions on RAM and Mobo blocks?<br>
This is very informative. Awesome work</div>
</div>
<br>
A full cover motherboard block is usually around 1.5 PSI or more, with some of EK's offerings having over 3 PSI of drop!<br><br>
Here is testing done by Skinnee for the ASUS Rampage III blocks:<br><br><img alt="R3E_pdrop-table.png" class="bbcode_img" src="http://skinneelabs.com/assets/images/BoardBlocks/R3E/R3E_pdrop-table.png"><br><br><br>
I can't find any data on RAM blocks but I would imagine blocks that cover the top of the multiple ram slots (think EK Dominator block) would be very unrestrictive wheras per stick solutions such as Koolance's would be more restrictive (1+ PSI)..
 

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It has little to no effect. From Martin's testing of the 35X:<br><br><img alt="35xreservoircomparison.png" class="bbcode_img" src="http://img403.imageshack.us/img403/5760/35xreservoircomparison.png"><br><br>
As you can see there is little difference around 1 GPM.
 

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Sticky would be good. I love the comment about aquacomputers being about double the PSI :p My AM3 block theoretically has 2.6 PSI of pressure drop... Glad I'm not having any other blocks in my loop when I finish it for my planned 1gpm flow rate :p
 

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Yeah, I don't know what aquacomputer block you have but the Kuplex Cryos HF is only about 2.0 PSI. I might change the recommend PSI drop for CPU blocks to 1.0, many blocks are below 1 PSI these days.<br><br><img alt="kHFpdrop.png" class="bbcode_img" src="http://skinneelabs.com/wp-content/uploads/kHFpdrop.png">
 

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I have the Kryos HF for AM2/AM3. Still waiting for the money for a pump & res yet. Attempting to get a 2nd PA120.2 or a GTX 240 for future expansion. Regardless I still know that a 655 is more than enough for a cpu only loop and at >1gpm flow.
 

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A sweet spot for pumps tends to be the old faithful MCP350 + Top giving the 4.48 PSI. The MCP355 tends to run hotter when worked harder vs. the MCP350 working harder. 4.48 PSI seems swell in a balanced loop for 1.0-1.5gpm of flow. Not too fast else the thermal transfer looses ground.<br><br>
Loved the charts and work here. <img alt="smile.gif" class="bbcode_smiley" src="http://files.overclock.net/images/smilies/smile.gif">
 
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