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Politically incorrect
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2600k has to be the oldest cpu I know of that many of my friends still use comfortably :)
My pfSense firewall has an E6300 and 2GB of RAM.
 

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Overclocking since 1998
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The 1st Ghz. CPU was DEC's Alpha.
You know, when I was thinking about including that statement, I was thinking "have to remember to specify x86", but when I finally wrote it, I forgot! Thanks for the correction.
 

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Climbin' in yo windows
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The Motorola G5 was pretty amazing when it came out. As far as systems I built, the Intel i7 2600k will always be special for me. I used it for 7 years and now it resides in my girlfriend’s gaming pc.
 

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2500K, 2600K and 2700K. Along with the 960T. I'm running a 5ghz 2500K typing this lol. The 960T I had was equally impressive although it was years ago. Unlocked to a 6 core and ran stable at 4.1ghz. Such a beast for the time.
 

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My personal experience, the i7-920/930. My main rig is still a i7-930. Built it back in 2010. Hoping to upgrade it this year or next year. X-58 was a game changer
 

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Bulldozer and ivy bridge stand out to me, bulldozer wasn't great but it was a tweakers wet dream with the headroom they had and the chips could take a severe beating in power consumption and voltage tolerance.

Ivy bridge was equally as resilient on the voltage and power consumption front. My 3770K lasted a long time at 1.65v making everything else just feel brittle, like an MSI motherboard.

Edit: The Pentium D805 was a really fun OC as well.

All the core 2 DUO's had massive headroom and could take a good amount of voltage.

Cpu's now, just boring to tweak in comparison.

Even compared to single core AMD Duron through the Athlon XP's with the jumpers on the package were very fun chips to tweak with.
 

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Without a doubt, it was the 386 because it became the writing on the wall to the potential of the pc as other than a novelty.

"The processor was a significant evolution in the x86 architecture and extended a long line of processors that stretched back to the Intel 8008. The predecessor of the 80386 was the Intel 80286, a 16-bit processor with a segment-based memory management and protection system. The 80386 added a three-stage instruction pipeline, extended the architecture from 16-bits to 32-bits, and added an on-chip memory management unit. This paging translation unit made it much easier to implement operating systems that used virtual memory. It also offered support for register debugging."
 

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My best CPU's are 486dx/2 66, PIV 3.Ghz Northwood, later CPU's are much better but I have nostalgia with these two.
AMD wise I had 1600+XP ahtlon and now Ryzen 2700X, both are good.
i7 4790 server me well, and i5 3570k. e8400 was classy.
 

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Core 2, first gen core i (i5-750) and 2nd gen (2500k). Phenom II x3 720 was pretty epic for gaming also.

i7's with 4 more threads weren't beneficial for gaming at that time. Not sure why people are mentioning 4790k. It's a little bit faster than 4770k which is a bit faster than 3770k which is a bit faster than 2600k. So I don't agree those are anywhere near legendary. 7700k especially is not.
 

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Legendary Worse:
I would have say the Pentium 4 H/T that would ruin power supplies, motherboards, and the CPU it'self.
Was the hottest, most power hungry CPU of all time for Intel. Cutting edge beta CPU.

Legendary Best:
Core 2 Quad Q6600 was the fist CPU I could overclock to 4.0GHZ, and run 100% stable at 3.8HGZ, and game all night at 3.6GHZ with stock @ 2.4GHZ using Nvidia's Chipset 780i
This CPU is now in my Wife's craft workstation slightly overclocked in a G31 motherboard micro case.

Legendary Honorable Mention:
Pentium III, the smoothest CPU ever made, never missed a beat, great performer, ran cool, and stable. stuck around through the garbage Pentium 4 & D era was well used until Core 2 era.
I have a couple of these in old PCs I keep for retro use.

My Favorite was the Intel socket 370 Celeron CPUs, so economical, and powerful. I used one for years doing programming, all way through WinXP Pro I upgraded to a Pentium D 820 and it was a Heater.
 

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E6320, Q6600, i3 530, AMD phenom era bxx unlock chips. value. Speed 9900k. I have had everything enbetween in some variant from either team only back as far as the 75mhz Pentium nothing prior. There are a lot of good chips but these are truly legendary for their release dates to me.
 

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I have to go with the CPU that really turned my interest in computer hardware into a more serious understanding of computer engineering: AMD Opteron 165. I bought it a year or so after it was out, and goy lucky with the chip's lot. I had that thing OC'd on air at 2.8 GHz from ~2005 to 2011, using a DFI motherboard that finally couldn't take the weight of the cooling tower and must have developed fatigue in the traces or somewhere else on the board. By 2011 it had moved to two different universities with me, and it wouldn't boot unless I turned the case on its side so the cooling tower's weight pressed down into the board, rather than bowing it when vertical.

I felt like I had that CPU forever, but my primary rig is still running a i5-2500k at 4.5 on air. The Win7 mitigations for spectre/meltdown really killed gaming performance for that chip, so much so that I had to disable them. While I'm looking forward to putting together a new system one day, I've been able to scratch the itch by building and then maintaining a wife-friendly OTA PVR / HTPC / steambox in the interim.
 

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My personal experience, the i7-920/930. My main rig is still a i7-930. Built it back in 2010. Hoping to upgrade it this year or next year. X-58 was a game changer
Still have X58 i7-920 running strong. Gave it my kid, he games constantly still paired with a 1050TI, built in 2009 still kicking in 2020 with lifetime warranty X58 SLI from EVGA
 

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fan o' water

The i7-2600k. Mine has been running at 4.5 Ghz for over 9 years. It served me well for over 4 years and has been serving my daughter well since then. I guess that means the P67 Sabretooth motherboard is pretty epic as well. Cheers
 

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Legends include the 8080A that I designed and built my first PC with in 1976 (2KB RAM, 8KB ROM, and a teletype user interface, programmed in machine code), the 8086 used in my first build of an actual personal computer in 1983 (640KB RAM, 2x360KB floppy drives, keyboard mouse and 16 color monitor), and the 80486 with its integrated coprocessor which I built a PC with in 1990 (25Mhz 80486, 16MB RAM, 1024x768 256 color graphics processor, 600MB hard drive). My current system has been evolving since first being built in late 2012 and now has a Core i7-4930K on an ASUS Rampage IV Black with 32 GB RAM and 40TB of hard disk with 480GB and 240GB SSD boot drives, two EVGA GTX 980 cards in SLI, and 3 27" 1920x1080 3D monitors. My retirement income probably wont let me build another top of the line system again but my needs fall more into the modern mainstream now that I no longer design computer and smartphone ICs for a living.
 

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Legends include the 8080A that I designed and built my first PC with in 1976 (2KB RAM, 8KB ROM, and a teletype user interface, programmed in machine code), the 8086 used in my first build of an actual personal computer in 1983 (640KB RAM, 2x360KB floppy drives, keyboard mouse and 16 color monitor), and the 80486 with its integrated coprocessor which I built a PC with in 1990 (25Mhz 80486, 16MB RAM, 1024x768 256 color graphics processor, 600MB hard drive). My current system has been evolving since first being built in late 2012 and now has a Core i7-4930K on an ASUS Rampage IV Black with 32 GB RAM and 40TB of hard disk with 480GB and 240GB SSD boot drives, two EVGA GTX 980 cards in SLI, and 3 27" 1920x1080 3D monitors. My retirement income probably wont let me build another top of the line system again but my needs fall more into the modern mainstream now that I no longer design computer and smartphone ICs for a living.
40TB of hard disk space for personal use, epic...
 

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LTSC for life crew
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Discussion Starter #79
It's all being used for backups no doubt. ;)

Media backups do take up an awful lot of room though. I remember sitting on something like 1.4TB of TV episodes for my parents alone, all ripped by hand with Handbrake. From back before I learned how to keep file sizes manageable.
 

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Eastern Bloc Electronics
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2500K as one of the longest running CPU's from current era that can still work fine.
2600K is basically 2500k + HT so It's the same opinion.

The Pentium M, the one that got us back from the nightmare called Netburst (Pentium 4).
Later it evolved into Core architecture.

Pentium 4 and Pentium D could be called legendary heaters at best.
To this day those can still be found running in some offices and not dying.

Athlon 64 for beating intel and proving that AMD can also be competitive.
Too bad Intel used dirty tricks to push the Pentium 4 despite it beeing worse.
I also consider the first-gen Ryzen to be a modern day legend.
Bringing AMD back as an alternative choice.


Elbrus architecture should also get a mention.
Created in USSR, later parts of the architecture found it's way into Intel cpu's as designers of the original architecture started working for Intel.
 
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