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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey, it might sound like a stupid question and im pretty sure it has already been asked on the forum but i can't find the answer to it anywere.

What's the benefit of dual channel?

i'd like to try it because my mainboard supports it.

and if i would try it is this a good ram to try out with:

GeIL DIMM 1 GB (Retail, GE1GB3200BDC, Dual Channel Kit)
CAS Latency (CL)2,5
RAS-to-CAS-Delay (tRCD) 4
RAS-Precharge-Time (tRP) 4
Row-Active-Time (tRAS) 8
Command Rate (CMD) 2 T
acces tim: 5 ns

2,6 Volt
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
ok tnx but what does it do does it just create 2 ddr bus 2 the memory can it acces both ram at the same time /w different instructions?
 

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Dual channel will give you about 50% performance increase over single. It allows 2 read/write commands at the same time.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by busa
Dual channel will give you about 50% performance increase over single. It allows 2 read/write commands at the same time.
I was under the impression that the performance increase was not that significant. I mean, if it was that much of a difference then I can't imagine why boards like the DFI Lanparty UT NF3 would not support it. And if it is an issue with the CPU (AMD for the DFI) then what would a 50% increase in memory efficiency really equate to in over all performance?

See, it is this kind of stuff that just starts to make my head spin.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Bindusar
I was under the impression that the performance increase was not that significant. I mean, if it was that much of a difference then I can't imagine why boards like the DFI Lanparty UT NF3 would not support it. And if it is an issue with the CPU (AMD for the DFI) then what would a 50% increase in memory efficiency really equate to in over all performance?

See, it is this kind of stuff that just starts to make my head spin.

It's not much of a difference at all in real world apps, but you'll see a boost in benchmarks like SiSandra when measuring total bandwidth. Here's a pretty thorough review showing that the difference is pretty minimal.

http://www.tcmagazine.info/articles....e=1&pagenum=13
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by sccr64472
It's not much of a difference at all in real world apps, but you'll see a boost in benchmarks like SiSandra when measuring total bandwidth. Here's a pretty thorough review showing that the difference is pretty minimal.

http://www.tcmagazine.info/articles....e=1&pagenum=13
The difference is like me running 1 gig stick instead of 2x 512's, not very much, certainly not a 50% performance gain.
Dual channel basically allows your two sticks of ram to run more effieciently like it was one stick. Performance gains are probably around 5%.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Bindusar
I was under the impression that the performance increase was not that significant. I mean, if it was that much of a difference then I can't imagine why boards like the DFI Lanparty UT NF3 would not support it. And if it is an issue with the CPU (AMD for the DFI) then what would a 50% increase in memory efficiency really equate to in over all performance?

See, it is this kind of stuff that just starts to make my head spin.

Hi Bindusar,

I'd have to agree with your statement of "I was under the impression that the performance increase was not that significant". The first motherboards with the Granite Bay chipset (E-7205/7505), circa 2003, didn't really show that much of an improvement of the older style Rambus (E-850). The main advantage was cost of memory and lower heat. Intel gave in to the public and ousted Rambus and went with the then "new" DDR ram. As we all know now, it was the way to go. As for the original question. In most reviews I've read the increase in memory band width can be good, if all of the other components are matched to make use of the extra bandwidtheg: cpu, DDR, hard drive, etc. If you don't have the right components the advantage will not be realized or if you only E-mail and web browse. I've also seen in reviews any where from 2-8% increases with dual-channel over the single channel mode, but as another post suggests only in certain situations like games or benchmarks. As always you're right on the money and why I like it here...

Take care, :)
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Bindusar
I was under the impression that the performance increase was not that significant. I mean, if it was that much of a difference then I can't imagine why boards like the DFI Lanparty UT NF3 would not support it. And if it is an issue with the CPU (AMD for the DFI) then what would a 50% increase in memory efficiency really equate to in over all performance?

See, it is this kind of stuff that just starts to make my head spin.

I'm guessing a 4% to 7% percent over all maybe higher.

I noticed an average of 5 frames per second increase on games I played when I went to dual channel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
so how much would it increase performance in lets say:

Emulating !!

my comp has a really hard time keeping the frame rate of emulating the psx above the required to play the game. At least thats at the quality of picture i want. i runned some diagnostics in the program i'm using and the statistics show me that the memory lags behind the rest.

Is dual channel a good solution for me?
 

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I would have to dis-agree, having initailly starting with mismatched RAM and going to matched Dual Channel is a significant upgrade in real word usability--pages load faster, thumbnails are faster in large folders, graphics SW processes and renders faster. Games run better. It is clearly significant as shown by benchmarking SW.

DDR Dual Data Rate and Dual Channel are two different things entirely although the aim of both is to increase bandwidth and speed the flow of instruction sets by allowing a more effeicient use of the architecture of the RAM. Using DDR in Dual Channel effectively Doubles the memory bandwidth.

The realworld realisation of this bandwidth will depend on the applications and hardware being used--for HT intel CPU's it is a good thing. If you seldom have a lot of threads and processes afoot in your machine then you might not notice the difference.
 
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