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Discussion Starter #1
So I'm getting bored and want to upgrade something on my rig. I noticed that the P7P55D Evo can take DDR3 2200 (O.C.)

Would that mean there is a chance DDR3 2200 will not work? Will I have any problems trying to get it stable? I'm assuming O.C. means overclocked, but does that mean DDR3 1600 ram overclocked to 2200 or system voltages have to be overclocked.

Basically, if I bought DDR3 2200 ram, is it 100% sure that it will work with my rig. Oh gah, I look at this text box and just see a wall of text. Thanks for the help.
 

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It means you have to overclock to reach those speeds.
 
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It means that to reach that ram speed, it will require you to overclock. More than likely it means you will have to at least slightly overclock the CPU in order to even set the ram at 2200mhz.

2200mhz ram is technically very heavily overclocked 1066mhz ram anyway. Ram rated at that speed should run that speed, the motherboard will more than likely run the ram at that speed, but the CPU will have to be pushed and a little work will need to be done to stabilize the ram at that speed.
 

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Some motherboards allow for the user to put ram in two DIMMs of a higher speed rating, adjust the voltage, and have an overclocked (O.C.) setup.

My mobo allows for 1066, 1333, or 1866 (O.C.). I could have purchased 1866 or 2000 RAM, slapped it in DIMMs 3/4, and tinkered in the BIOS to have overclocked RAM.

It's my understanding that when doing this, the board only allows for the two specified slots to be filled to get this overclock. (Someone correct me if I'm mistaken).

So if you want 8GB of OC'd RAM, make sure to get twin 4GB sticks, and then set your voltage and timings appropriately so you run in a stable fashion.
 

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It's called OC because JEDEC standards don't go that high, so the stock specs for that memory require your board to be able to push out the right speeds/timings, which normally means clocking something up somewhere.
 

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That stands for oc so what it is refering to is overclocked memory speeds meaning you can hit that on an OC.
 
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