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What does it do? Is it ok if I set this at 1.50v? I am using high end water cooling.
 

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My max in BIOS is 1.50v. What does FSB termination voltage actually do?
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">FSB Termination voltage, which is the termination voltage of the host bus but, more importantly, also the bus supply voltage. Intel’s specifications allow voltage levels between 0.83 and 1.65 on the termination buffers, however, keep in mind that the voltage is the same as the bus supply voltage, which is limited to a maximum of 1.29 according to Intel’s specifications. We did find that increasing the FSB termination voltage caused the CPU temperature to increase, at least compared to the “Auto” setting. Consequently, also the CPU throttling kicked in earlier and, particularly in graphics applications, the system had a tendency to freeze, followed by ATI’s VPU recovery message blaming ATI’s drivers.<br><br>
Keep in mind here that the only thing changed was the manual setting of the FSB termination voltage, while all other system parameters remained identical. On the other hand, the strange behavior of misreporting benchmark results could be completely eliminated, with the caveat that higher bus frequencies required higher termination … er, bus supply voltages. In so far, all of this makes sense now. The Prescott with its much better utilization of the bus puts more strain on the bus itself including the clock domains – which, therefore heat up faster and consequently, need more voltage. On the other hand, a higher bus supply voltage also causes the bus to run hotter and, in addition, may cause more passive power drain from the CPU- which consequently will run hotter and throttle earlier.</td>
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o_O - I just found it, but it doesn't make much sense to me.
 
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Frozenshinobi</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">What does it do? Is it ok if I set this at 1.50v? I am using high end water cooling.</div>
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I suggest you do a lot of reading and begin with the beginner's guides to overclocking. You don't simply change values and increase voltages "just because". There's a time when increasing a voltage is necessary,but should only be done when it's needed. The guessing game approach will give you very poor results.
 

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So it looks like the only reason to increase fsb termination voltage is when you have a high fsb?
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>sccr64472</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I suggest you do a lot of reading and begin with the beginner's guides to overclocking. You don't simply change values and increase voltages "just because". There's a time when increasing a voltage is necessary,but should only be done when it's needed. The guessing game approach will give you very poor results.</div>
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I know this, I was asking 2 questions in 1 post. I wanted to know what it was and if 1.5v was safe (since that is the highest I saw in my bios), I am not suggesting that I will set it to 1.5 even if it is safe just because. I was just asking for information for the future, that if I found out that raising this voltage was beneficial, I would already have an idea of what a safe max voltage would be.
 
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