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Discussion Starter #1
Hello.
Ive never actually found any information on this topic.
What is GPU binning?
Thanks.
 

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I don't know the exact process.

But the jist is that chips are tested at the factory, and binned (as in, put in a bin) based on their test results. Higher binned chips, or better binned chips, being the ones that are more tolerant of voltages or more stable, etc
 

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AMD harvesting is:

If an IC passes tests, then it is branded as the HD5870. If it doesn't, but is still workable, it becomes the HD5850 or HD5830. Same case with nVidia (GTX260 is a binned GTX280, GTX470 is a binned GTX480).

That is what GPU manufactures call binning or harvesting.

CPU, it's the same, except only the multi gets changed/locked.

Worst bins are thrown out.
 

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the same as CPU binning... just with GPUs


Quote:
Based on the test result of class testing processors with the same capabilities are put into the same transporting trays. This process is called "binning," a process with which many Tom's Hardware readers will be familiar. Binning determines the maximum operating frequency of a processor, and batches are divided and sold according to stable specifications.
They take the lesser capable chips and step them down a bit and sell them as a model where they will run stock speed @ x volts 100% stable... rather then risk selling a part that might not hack it at a higher speed @ x volts and have it fail and get RMA'd

Think GTX 465 vs 470... some reports indicated that some early 465 included the same configured PCB as the 470 (not missing any components) and just a lesser bios... once unlocked by some it was basically like buying a 470 for less... This isnt exactly what binning does... but it stands to reason that NVIDIA sold 470 chips that were binned lower... as 465 chips for mfgs.
 
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