Overclock.net banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
221 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have this old i5-650 and I'm debating whether it can be used in a portable PC or not. It has to fit in the Streacom FC9 and run off of a 160W picoPSU together with MSI's Low Profile GTX 750 Ti, but i don't know what the power draw is like because I've never worked with Clarkdale before. Intel ARK says that the 650's TDP is 73W, but I'm under the impression that 73W is pretty high a power target because the i5-661 is more or less the same CPU but with a 900MHz iGPU clock compared to the 650's 733MHz GPU clock and its TDP is 87W. So does anyone know if the TDP will still be 73W if I use a GTX 750 Ti and not the integrated graphics? I know Clarkdale OCs but obviously I'm going to keep it at stock or even perhaps turn off turbo. 73W + 60W is a bit higher than I'd like.

The board I have is the P55-M from Asus. The only other options I have is either a 7850K build in the smaller F1C EVO, or a 4130/4330 + same GTX 750 Ti same case, and they both cost more.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,051 Posts
It helps to read the post
tongue.gif


I think you should be fine, without the iGPU active it shouldn't utilize a lot of extra wattage.
 

·
Ultra wide wide wide.....
Joined
·
5,290 Posts
What's the amperage on the 12 volt rail of your PSU?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,492 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyclops View Post

What's the amperage on the 12 volt rail of your PSU?
As far as I know, PicoPSUs generally take a 15-19V input, convert it to 12V and then convert from 12V down for 5 and 3 so it's basically 160W of 12V if he needs it.

I could be wrong about the above but either way, I owned an i3 540 and they are very low wattage chips so you should be fine with that and a 750 Ti.

Edit: And by "they are very low wattage chips" I mean mine shipped with the tiniest aluminium heatsink I've seen on a CPU and I could OC to 4GHz+ on it so they don't use near 70W at stock.
 

·
Ultra wide wide wide.....
Joined
·
5,290 Posts
Every PC power supply has at least a single 12 volt rail in which it can supply a certain amount of amps. I'm interested to know how many of those amps his PSU can provide.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top