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I'm about ready to finally retire my Tri Sli GTX Titan /4.8 Ghz 3930k build.

This time around, I'm planning on 2x or 3x SLI with GTX 1080s (although I will probably see how support for 3x pans out before getting the third card), and a 6850k. The plan is to set up an entire room for PC gaming with one of the new LG 65 inch 4k OLEDs and my home theater surround sound setup. Now that I won't be gaming in headphones anymore though, noise is going to be a concern.

Roughly how much is it going to cost to set up watercooling on a dual SLI system, and how long will it take if this is my first time? I don't necessary need to have the very, very best gear because at this stage in my life, I'm fine with a good reliable OC rather than squeezing out every last mhz, but I want a high end system that will keep my stuff cold and have a low risk of accidents.

To reduce user error, I might buy GTX 1080's with built in blocks. Roughly how long does it usually take in the card cycle for something like that to become available and what is the typical price premium over a reference card?
 

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Hybrid solutions like the Evga Hydro copper will be available pretty quickly.

I'd hold off for 1080 Tis.

As for the Watercooling...

It's a hobby not a solution. Quieter maybe yes but pump noise has been a problem over the years for me personally.

Cooler than air yes but all the money time effort stress (and destroyed parts) I've put into it... But I'm an extreme case.

You can set your budget up anywhere from 300$+ for gear (fittings, blocks, rads, fans, pump, and tubing) on up, but pretty much no matter what you do you'll spend at least twice as much as what you originally planned. You generally end up with more parts than you need because options (extra fittings I have bags of).

Time will stretch Einstein style. It's a steep learning curve.
 

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i would recommend the ek predator as a base for the whole setup. its has the reservoir, pump and rad all grouped together which reduces cluster. the only downside is that the ddc pump might be a little nosier compared to the d5 pump. you need to state your budget so that we can further recommend you the parts. i will also need to know how much you know about water cooling so that i can further elaborate on the parts if you dont understand any of it.
 

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Prices for watercooling varies greatly based on the components you are using and quantity you need, and it does take some time getting things set up(mounting blocks, running tubing and wires, and leak testing) but after that its fairly easy to maintain(i spend 1-2 days a year doing maintenance on my loop).

For a system like the one youre proposing you are gonna need waterblocks for the cpu and gpus, at least 360mm of radiator for decent temps, pump and reservoir, 2 fittings for each component(depending, youre probably gonna use an SLI bridge for the GPUs so thats 2 fittings for both of those and if you get a pump/reservoir combo you would need only 2 fittings for those as well), tubing and fans.

If noise is a concern you would probably want to go with something like a D5 vario(or a D5 PWM) set to low speed and low speed fans.

I cant say anything about release dates for cards with waterblocks...

Oh, and if youre gonna go 1080s Ive heard that they will only support 2-way crossfire... you should check that out.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by electro2u View Post

Hybrid solutions like the Evga Hydro copper will be available pretty quickly.

I'd hold off for 1080 Tis.

As for the Watercooling...

It's a hobby not a solution. Quieter maybe yes but pump noise has been a problem over the years for me personally.

Cooler than air yes but all the money time effort stress (and destroyed parts) I've put into it... But I'm an extreme case.

You can set your budget up anywhere from 300$+ for gear (fittings, blocks, rads, fans, pump, and tubing) on up, but pretty much no matter what you do you'll spend at least twice as much as what you originally planned. You generally end up with more parts than you need because options (extra fittings I have bags of).

Time will stretch Einstein style. It's a steep learning curve.
agreed with pretty much all of this. especially the bit about having extra parts (and by extension, more money being spent).

one thing i may disagree with slightly is the release of hydro copper cards... i guess it all depends on our definitions.. but I would guess it will be at least a month before we see a hydro copper. then you have to consider when you'd actually be able to get your hands on one. Bottom line is, we need to start seeing non-reference designs, then we can start thinking about the hydro coppers. Regardless, I would advise against a hydro copper anyways.. im sure someone will disagree, but i think youre better off just getting your own cards and blocks.. As long as you stick with popular cards, you should be able to get your hands on a full-cover block that fits it. I'd recommend staying with EVGA.. just my personal preference (great warranty that is transferable, don't void for removing factory cooler, popular and always have FC blocks offered by EK, etc.)
 

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sorry, a little late to the thread. But, I would estimate this for a custom cooling solution:

CPU block: $70
GPU Block: $125 x2
Radiator: $100 for a 360mm/$80 for a 240mm, if you want quiet you will want two 360mm with slower fans
Fans: $15-20 x5/6, with more rad space, push only configuration is fine
Fittings: about $120
Tubing: $25
Pump: $110 for a D5
Res: $60 (can get combo pump/res to save space and money)

its not cheap and kits can save a little, but you will have to add to any kit you buy anyways.

Time: this is a hard one to estimate. You can put it together in a day or two, or over a month. depends on how you work.

http://www.performance-pcs.com/ may be helpful to you for pricing.
 
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