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What Linux distribution do you prefer?

1960 Views 38 Replies 32 Participants Last post by  GodofGrunts
I am sick of trying to install Windows7 and failing!
Anyway, I fancy using Linux and gaining a little experiance with a Linux distribution.

What do you use and why did you pick it over other distro's?

Thanks.
1 - 20 of 39 Posts
<3 CrunchBang Linux. The Lite edition is super fast.
Ubuntu of course, but I always had a thing for OpenSuse.
OpenSuse was my first, but I learned to hate rpms and the mechanisms attached to it. Fell in love with the deb system but had a hard time finding a distro that was as "nice" as OpenSuse. Settled with Debian for a while, but then rediscovered Ubuntu; been trying it since the 5.x days but could never get into it, and it wasn't until the 6.x series that it really started to set itself apart (before it felt like just another spin on Debian testing with even less system stability). Nowadays Ubuntu I think has the perfect mix of "bleeding edge" to satisfy the average Linux user, and ease of use and system stability so you can actually, you know, get stuff done.
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Tried OpenSuse a few distro's ago,but stuck with Fedora it just seems to fit me better.
Linux Mint.

easy to use out of the box and lets me enjoy using my PC instead of configuring and installing things like codecs, etc

Arch as well, but that's a different animal
Quote:

Originally Posted by -iceblade^ View Post
Linux Mint.

easy to use out of the box and lets me enjoy using my PC instead of configuring and installing things like codecs, etc

Arch as well, but that's a different animal
I use mint as well.

And yes, Arch is definitely a different animal. I've always wanted to have the free time enough to sit down and do a proper arch install. But I'm a Senior in college, so no free time for me (Between school, and girlfriend that is)
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Quote:


Originally Posted by -iceblade^
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lets me enjoy using my PC instead of configuring and installing things like codecs, etc

I enjoy the process of configuring my system to my needs, including custom kernel compilation.
---
Sidux user here (which is essentially debian sid)
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2
Quote:


Originally Posted by hybrid-kernel
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I enjoy the process of configuring my system to my needs, including custom kernel compilation.
---
Sidux user here (which is essentially debian sid)

oh hush - you know what i mean
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Kubuntu
Ubuntu 9.10 and Linux Mint 7 are great, and Slax is great for a portable OS (I have it on my 512MB flash drive, use it at school)
Fedora. It's what my brother's friend was using, so I wanted someone I could ask questions. 5 years later I'm still satisfied with what it offers. It really improved once they combined the core repositories with the others. They're a little bleeding edge, so stuff changes a lot, but I think that's good.
Since lots of people are just going (and are already recommending I see) to recommend what distros they use themselves, I'm going to give you some real suggestions.

If you want to really try out Linux and see how it works internally, and build up a Linux system from almost the beginning, try one of the following:

- Slackware
- Linux From Scratch (LFS) - although not that great to use daily
- Arch Linux
- Gentoo (source based, only recommended if you have a fast CPU, preferably multicore)

If you want to jump right into it while still not having everything preconfigured:

- Debian
- Fedora
- OpenSUSE
- Sidux

If you want to just have an OS that works with a minimal amount of configuration:

- Ubuntu (and any of its variants)
- Linux Mint
- Crunchbang (variant of Ubuntu)
- Ubuntu Ultimate Edition

etc.

I personally recommend Arch - its BSD-like setup is really appealing to me, and doesn't leave me completely confused in case I have to set up a BSD server at work.
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My favorite is Fedora.
I usually advise people getting started with Linux to use Ubuntu.

But I myself don't really care for Ubuntu; I use Fedora.

The big difference you'll notice is that in Fedora it takes two clicks instead of one to get access to restricted software such as codecs and proprietary video drivers.

The other big difference you'll notice is that Fedora is blue and Ubuntu is brown.


The differences go deeper, of course.

I personally use Fedora to gain access to the latest available technology, especially with respect to my absolute favorite thing ever, virtualization. For instance, Red Hat recently rolled out a new Enterprise Virtualization for Servers product for large business datacenters. But they also pushed the base underlying technology (KVM) into Fedora. There's an ongoing technology transfer back and forth between Fedora and Red Hat.

I also use it to keep myself current with enterprise Linux. I run a bunch of servers myself, so having a desktop that is similar to my server environments helps a lot.

See also the links in my sig.
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Ubuntu---easiest to use///...
Sidux user here (which is essentially debian sid)[/QUOTE]

Me too. If you want a cutting edge system, (that does require some technical knowledge), then Sidux is a great option.

I've tried a few various distros over the years (roughly in order):

Mandrake (forgotten the version)
Knoppix (Forgotten the version)
Gnoppix (forgotten the version)
Xandros 3.02 OCE
Ubuntu 6.04, 7.10
Puppy (forgotten the version)
Xubuntu 8.04
Sidux 2008-04 pontos (and onwards, in it's rolling updates)

I've discovered I prefer debian/debian based distros, and that I prefer KDE to gnome. KDE4 is beautiful, and has some wonderful desktop management features in it. Sidux was the only one of those distros which really "captured" me, ubuntu came close. Although it's relentless updating makes it a bit to cutting edge for me, I'd love something that was between Debian testing and sid, and used KDE4.
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Quote:


Originally Posted by gonX
View Post

If you want to really try out Linux and see how it works internally, and build up a Linux system from almost the beginning, try one of the following:

- Slackware
- Linux From Scratch (LFS) - although not that great to use daily
- Arch Linux
- Gentoo (source based, only recommended if you have a fast CPU, preferably multicore)

If you want to jump right into it while still not having everything preconfigured:

- Debian
- Fedora
- OpenSUSE
- Sidux

If you want to just have an OS that works with a minimal amount of configuration:

- Ubuntu (and any of its variants)
- Linux Mint
- Crunchbang (variant of Ubuntu)
- Ubuntu Ultimate Edition

etc.

This is a good post.

In order for us to not just recommend our own favourite, the OP will need to give some more specifications (e.g. Gnome, KDE, Xfce, flux etc. What hardware [old vs new], rolling update or regular releases etc)
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Great posts guys.

I think the best way really is to try them all (the popular ones), or at least a fair few!
Well, I have a lot of downloading to do!
I've tried a lot of distributions lately, looking for one that would do well for general desktop use.
Mandriva, Slackware, Sidux, Mint, SimplyMEPIS, ANTIX, openSUSE, Ubuntu, CentOS, Fedora, Parsix, xange, Mandriva, ALT Linux, Debian, gnewsense, midiflux, arch, deli, siltaz and PCLinuxOS.

PCLinuxOS was very satisfying, nicely preconfigured, using features and programs I like, but lacks 64 bit support of any kind.
SimplyMEPIS is a very good, solid distro.
ALT is very nice and I might end up using it as my main OS, no english community though.
openSUSE and LinuxMint are also good, give them a try.

I've yet to decide apparently.
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