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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Have this Super Talent DDR3-2000 CL7 memory and they either really stink or I'm missing something. I can't seem to stabilize these anywhere other than running at 1700MHz at 9-9-9-28. Which completely blows compared to what these are rated at. What confuses me is the built in XMP timings:

Since I don't see a way to insert a table, this may be clugy but here is what the XMP timings come up to for this memory. For some reason the timings get tighter the faster the memory goes:

FREQ, CAS#, RAS# to CAS#, RAS# Precharge, tRAS, tRC, Command Rate, Voltage
711,8,8,8,25,33,1T,1.50V
800,9,9,9,28,37,1T,1.50V
900,7,7,7,21,36,1T,1.65V
1000,7,7,7,21,40,2T,1.65V

So explain why they wouldn't have 7-7-7-21 timings at 711MHz which should be easier to do then running at 2000MHz.

Thanks.

JR
 

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The memory is rated to go that fast, but the motherboard's memory controller becomes the limiting factor. You have to pump insane voltages through your NB if you want to even get close to DDR3-2000 stable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Quote:


Originally Posted by The_0ctogon
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The memory is rated to go that fast, but the motherboard's memory controller becomes the limiting factor. You have to pump insane voltages through your NB if you want to even get close to DDR3-2000 stable.

Thanks for the reply. Excuse my ignorance, however in the case of the NB, since my config which I didn't mention previously (Asus Rampage III Extreme and 980x) doesn't technically have one, I would assume that is the QPI Voltage?

Also still don't understand the tighter timings the faster the memory goes, think it would be the opposite.

Thanks.

JR
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jriker1;15330882
Thanks for the reply. Excuse my ignorance, however in the case of the NB, since my config which I didn't mention previously (Asus Rampage III Extreme and 980x) doesn't technically have one, I would assume that is the QPI Voltage?

Also still don't understand the tighter timings the faster the memory goes, think it would be the opposite.

Thanks.

JR
The QPI/uncore voltage, yes. I was going off of what is in your sig. And the XMP timings don't make sense, but that is just laziness on the manufacturer's part. The highest frequency profile is the only one that really matters, though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Sorry about the sig, new system I am still trying to stablize so not my "current" system. Right now I'm at 1.66975V as the next lowest is 1.65something and wasn't working. Also upped the QPI Volt to 1.4V. Upping the memory to 1.669... seemed to help some right now in a quick test but may cause a lot of heat.

By the way, came across an interesting article that said:

"Technically, the maximum DRAM speed for a stable system is equal to ((Max. Uncore) / (Safe QPI:Uncore Ratio)) / 2 or (4.0GHz / 9:8) / 2 = 1.777GHz. In between 1.777GHz DRAM and 2.0GHz DRAM you are likely to experience some level of instability over the long term. Past 2.0GHz you are just plain lucky."

Love formulas. If it was that simple but still interesting. How do you find out the Uncore "Ratio"?

Thanks.

JR
 

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the lower set profiles are jdec not xmp.. the xmp profile should be the last one if you look under the spd tab.. unless if the previous owner flashed to a different spd.

Attachment 234433

Technically they don't get tighter as they go up in frequency... since there should only be one xmp profile

as for getting them stable.. sorry, if you were on 1155,1156 or maybe 1366 i can help.. not sure about 775 stuff

 
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