Overclock.net banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,031 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I've built a new computer for my roommate. It has a 3TB Seagate HDD.

He wanted the newest OS on it, so I used a DreamSpark copy of Windows 8.1 Pro on his system. I've never used 8.1 before, and only used 8.0 when it was the Developer Preview.
The optical drive on my system is currently disconnected, so I used the proper tool to make a bootable USB drive to install 8.1.

I had to quit the install partway through because it was asking for drivers, and I didn't know what drivers it wanted. On the second attempt it told me to let it boot to the main drive instead of attempting to install again.
I did this, and it worked fine. Got the account set up, downloaded drivers, everything was good.

Then, we saw that Windows was only noticing 2TB of the 3TB on the system.

Doing some very quick searching (and I will admit I did not look on here, my mistake), we got to Seagate's website where it recommended installing DiskWizard.
I've never used this software, but I figured the company that makes the hard drive wouldn't put it out there if it was utter rubbish.

We did so, and it claimed to extend the partition to cover the extra ~750GB that was left out of the partition (darn drive companies, selling them at 1000MB/GB when they're made at 1024MB/GB).
Disk Management showed it as Disk 1 and Disk 2, and I took that to be DiskWizard doing its job.

I shut down the computer, and went to go into BIOS to see if there was a setting to switch between MBR and GPT for the hard drive, to eliminate having to use DiskWizard.
Not finding anything, I exited BIOS.

I was greeted with a message saying the boot partition in the HDD was missing data, and to reinsert the install media and select Repair.

I put the USB in, set it to boot from that, and I can't get anything under Repair to work.
It tells me the drive is locked, and I have to unlock it to repair or erase the drive.
Using a restore point doesn't work, since there isn't any.
The command prompt works, but I don't know what I need to do to get this working again.

I'm okay with just hooking the drive to my rig and formatting the drive if I need to.
However, if it can be fixed inside the computer so I don't have to take apart my nice cable management, I will be much happier.

Thank you very much in advance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
800 Posts
Type "diskpart" in command line and then "list disk" (without he quotes) and tell us what it says.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,031 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I will do this when I get home from work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,031 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigTree View Post

Type "diskpart" in command line and then "list disk" (without he quotes) and tell us what it says.
Code:

Code:
Microsoft DiskPart version 6.3.9600

*copyright boilerplate*
On computer: MININT-QFDI0G5

DISKPART> list disk

Disk ###             Status         Size             Free          Dyn          Gpt
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Disk 0               Online         2794 GB          0 B
Disk 1               Online         30 GB            0 B
That doesn't look good.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,009 Posts
The 2 TB stuff is about MBR partitions vs. GPT, I think? MBR had some sort of 2 TB limit, though I don't quite know if it wasn't just about partition sizes instead of the whole drive.

In any case, you could convert the drive to GPT if the BIOS in that PC can use it to boot from. It needs an "UEFI" BIOS to accomplish that. I don't quite know how new that UEFI stuff is. The Ivy Bridge generation boards I've seen all had it and all older stuff I've seen didn't, but I've only seen very old stuff mostly. I don't know at what point boards switched over from old BIOS stuff to UEFI stuff.

To convert stuff to GPT, the Windows Disk Management tool can only do it if the drive is completely empty. This means you have to delete all partitions. To convert stuff, you right-click in the lower half of Disk Management on the drive on the left side where it says "Disk 0", "Disk 1", etc. There will be a menu entry called "convert to GPT" if the drive is currently MBR. If you right-click on a drive that is currently GPT, you'll see "convert to MBR". Those two menu entries are usually grayed out. They become available the moment you have deleted all partitions on the drive.

There are alternative third party tools that act as a replacement of the Disk Management tool of Windows. Those tools will be able to do things like convert MBR to GPT without having to delete partitions. One such tool you might want to look at is "MiniTool Partition Wizard". I don't know if you can get away with not re-installing Windows 8.1 after you do this change. I am worried that Windows will not boot after a change. If I were you, I would delete all partitions, convert to GPT and then reinstall Windows 8.1 from scratch. This also means you wouldn't need a third party tool, could use Disk Management.

You can do the change on the guy's PC. There is a way to get into Disk Management from inside the Windows installation program. I think the button to get to it is on the screen where you see a list of possible target locations and are asked to choose one. You would click on that button, then in the Disk Management tool delete all partitions and convert to GPT afterwards, then continue with the installation. I don't remember if you have to click on some sort of "custom" or "expert" installation option at some point to get to see all that stuff about selection options for target drive and whatnot.
 

·
Windows Wrangler
Joined
·
2,251 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tohru Rokuno View Post

We did so, and it claimed to extend the partition to cover the extra ~750GB that was left out of the partition (darn drive companies, selling them at 1000MB/GB when they're made at 1024MB/GB).
1000 MB per GB is not only the official definition of GB, it is the correct and logical definition as well. It is people's greediness and Microsoft's stubbornness (for 15 years!) that even allow this "problem" to continue. The IEC resolved the issue back in December 1998 before it would have even become well known. If Microsoft had simply followed the standards change, everything would be fine now. I pity the poor HDD manufacturers who get lawsuits over using math that adds up and following the official standards, while Microsoft gets away scot-free for continuing the foolish and inconsistent "1024" standard. Mac OS has it right.
smile.gif
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,031 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
+REP to deepor and BigTree for your help. I ended up connecting the drive to my Windows 7 rig and converting the disk to GPT with Disk Management on there. Then I burned the Win8.1 ISO to disk and in the boot order made sure to choose the UEFI option on the drive. Works as well as 8.1 can now. Thanks.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Techie007 View Post

1000 MB per GB is not only the official definition of GB, it is the correct and logical definition as well. It is people's greediness and Microsoft's stubbornness (for 15 years!) that even allow this "problem" to continue. The IEC resolved the issue back in December 1998 before it would have even become well known. If Microsoft had simply followed the standards change, everything would be fine now. I pity the poor HDD manufacturers who get lawsuits over using math that adds up and following the official standards, while Microsoft gets away scot-free for continuing the foolish and inconsistent "1024" standard.
Someone got worked up a lot over what was supposed to be a mildly amusing aside. It wasn't a big deal with small drives but with terabyte drives the difference between the box and the computer is ~7%. The roommate commented on it, which is why it went in the post.
Quote:
Mac OS has it right.
smile.gif
Now that's just crazy talk.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top