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The tiny silicon chip works at room temperatures and can be mass-produced, with 32 chips on a 4-inch silicon wafer. Previous efforts slowed light to just 0.01 miles per second, but this required a roomful of equipment and temperatures near absolute zero.
source

seems pretty interesting
thinking.gif
, not sure if a repost though.
 

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So, anyone care to explain to me why it is necesssary to Slow light down?
I thought the inherent speed of light.. was its benefit as concerning its use for computing.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trigunflame;12019658
So, anyone care to explain to me why it is necesssary to Slow light down?
I thought the inherent speed of light.. was its benefit as concerning its use for computing.
I believe it's possible to store info in light. Not sure though...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trigunflame;12019658
So, anyone care to explain to me why it is necesssary to Slow light down?
I thought the inherent speed of light.. was its benefit as concerning its use for computing.
Because its possible to transmit data through light, except we can't decode it fast enough, so first we must slow light down to a point we can 'read' it.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by .:hybrid:.;12019740
Because its possible to transmit data through light, except we can't decode it fast enough, so first we must slow light down to a point we can 'read' it.
I think it is more due to making information readable in general. We use pulses to communicate through devices, slowing down light may just be the method to use to distinguish between tasks on another level besides pulses.
 

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They want to slow it down so they can artificially increase the speed of processors based on this technology over the years. True story.
 

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Originally Posted by Hephasteus
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Ya. They are going to fix global warming by underclocking the sun. Al Gore the scientist will be getting another citizenship award.

Trolololololololol
 

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Slow down light, so we can put it into a computer and use it like a CPU as fibre optics work sorta.
 

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Originally Posted by iliatay;12038107
whats the difference between sending light signals and electrical signals??
Light travels a lot faster than an electric current for one, but in this case i believe they're trying something with qubits instead of bits, and that is far too complicated for me
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iliatay;12038107
whats the difference between sending light signals and electrical signals??
Electrons are becoming just too slow for modern computing.

Moving data with light is based on the modulation of laser light traveling through a glass fiber, with virtually none of the energy loss associated with electrical transmissions.
 

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Originally Posted by Hephasteus
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Ya. They are going to fix global warming by underclocking the sun. Al Gore the scientist will be getting another citizenship award.

Al Gore has nothing on Bob Brown
 

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Argh, just because their experiments were done using something made on a silicon wafer substrate does NOT mean they made a processor--read the article people. All they did was create a substrate that takes light and converts it to a slightly different form of that light--which takes a small bit of time because of the transitions that the rubidium atoms must undergo. I don't understand why the article showcases it as something new, because it's not, and it's done when you use or make a Rubidum laser, which are not uncommon forms of lasers that output infrared light. The extreme amount that light is slowed down is nice, but to quote the conductor of the experiments:

Quote:


Originally Posted by Source

Those experiments were “fantastic and very inspiring, but with limited practical applications,†said electrical engineer Holger Schmidt of the University of California, Santa Cruz, who led the study published in November’s Nature Photonics.

 

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Considering Einstein's axiom that the speed of light is constant, and that until very recently it was thought that photons have any mass at all only because of their constant and extreme speed, it is still an interesting subject and worthy of a thread, even though at least 60% here don't even know what an "axiom" is and are too lazy to look it up.

Ignorance is fixable. Stupidity goes right down to deoxyribonucleic acid.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by enorbet2
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Considering Einstein's axiom that the speed of light is constant, and that until very recently it was thought that photons have any mass at all only because of their constant and extreme speed, it is still an interesting subject and worthy of a thread, even though at least 60% here don't even know what an "axiom" is and are too lazy to look it up.

Ignorance is fixable. Stupidity goes right down to deoxyribonucleic acid.

It's interesting though--because the speed of light IS constant--the caveat is that it's constant for a given medium with given physical properties. Change the medium or the properties, and of course the speed of light will change accordingly, and it's threshed out in the theory quite accurately. So clarify what you are trying to imply here. It's nothing new that the speed of light has been slowed down, and no one said that the speed of light must always be ~3e^8 m/s under all conditions. BEC's--nearly the same one that the quoted research used--were postulated in the early 20th century, and then observed in the lab in the mid-90's.
 

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@guyladouche
I wasn't implying that light speed wasn't still a constant. Given the sea change that came with Quantum Mechanics, it's pretty amazing how well 1930-1940 Einstein has held up. With the exception of the Cosmological Constant blunder (which Einstein himself regretted) there is nothing afaik that has been definitively refuted.

What you likely sensed was my grousing about how little people are fascinated anymore with hard Science, especially in the US, and instead are so fond of Vampires and Demons. Gahhh! The real magic is in Math, Physics, and Cosmology.
 
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