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My modem, which also is my wireless router, is about 15 feet from my wireless adapter that I use to play games online, the signal strength pretty much stays at maximum all the time and I don't get any spikes. I was wondering what kind of latency does connecting to the internet this way have? Checked with speedtest.net and connecting to a server in my city gives me 10-20ms, across america I get about 100ms. What kind of difference would I see if I switched to a wired router, or if I just connected straight to the modem?
 

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latency is MOST affected by the distance that packets are traveling to you, or to the servers you are trying to access. if you are on the west coast of the USA and trying to play a game on a server based in russia or even the east coast of the US, your latency will be higher because of the distance that the packets have to travel to reach their destination. if you ping other PC's on your lan, there will be virtually no latency (think about how far those packets are traveling). i dont think that changing from wireless to wired will help you dramatically unless you have a really poor AP.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by nachoz;13048291
My modem, which also is my wireless router, is about 15 feet from my wireless adapter that I use to play games online, the signal strength pretty much stays at maximum all the time and I don't get any spikes. I was wondering what kind of latency does connecting to the internet this way have? Checked with speedtest.net and connecting to a server in my city gives me 10-20ms, across america I get about 100ms. What kind of difference would I see if I switched to a wired router, or if I just connected straight to the modem?
Ping it.

Go to command line and type "ipconfig".
Get the Default Gateway IP.
Then type in "ping [gateway IP]".

Latency should be 1ms or <1ms.
 

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Latency shouldn't have a huge bump with wireless, you can generally get from 1-6 or 7 ms in a general environment (it's a little spikey).

The main thing you would gain from switching to wired is not losing as many packets.
With TCP it's not as big of a deal since there are retransmit mechanisms, but if you drop a UDP packet you'll never get/receive that bit of information. The majority of games use UDP.
 
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