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Discussion Starter #1
So tomorrow, November 25th, I'll be deliding my 4690K via vise method. When OC'ed my 4690K gets way to hot at 4.3GHz and 1.150v. I'm talking about hitting 95c on full load through stress testing. Crazy temps for a modest OC.

I got everything in the mail today; a drill vise, some Thermal Grizzly liquid metal, some Arctic Cleaner and Purifier and razor blades. I've looked at several videos on YouTube on how to delid so I'm not nervous about the actual deliding process. I'm nervous about taking my 4690K out of my motherboard socket. When I installed my CPU years ago I lined up the CPU with the socket arrow and closed the clamp. Only when closing the clamp, the clamp made a crunching sound as it fixed the CPU into position. I have never taken the CPU out since installation and am afraid I bent some socket pins. Everything works fine so I know the CPU is okay but I'm very unsure about the socket.

So tomorrow I'll find out if I bricked my PC or not after taking the 4690K out of the motherboard socket and deliding it. Hopefully all will go well. If not I have to buy new CPU, motherboard and RAM. I'm prepared to fail and buy new stuff but I would prefer to keep my Z97 Rig as its served me well over these past years.

Wish me luck guys! I need it!
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If you bent any pins, you would have found out a long time ago.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I just got finished rebuilding my PC. Took two days since I decided to dust and clean my case. Also bought some new case fans which are working well now.

So I took my 4690K out of the motherboard socket and was happy that everything is in pristine condition. The crunching noise I heard must have been the socket harness clamping down under the bolt mount. What a relief! After taking the CPU out I cleaned it up with some toilet paper and Arctic Clean before putting it in the vise. They put a lot of silicone on my chip as I needed to apply more pressure than I wanted to but after some torque I was successful in deliding my 4690K.

After that I went through the cleaning process before putting it in the motherboard socket. I applied Thermal Grizzley's liquid metal while the CPU was in the motherboard socket, big mistake. The liquid metal came out fast and suddenly and I flinched and got some liquid metal on the motherboard. Took awhile to clean off and I thought I bricked my PC because of my mistake of applying while the CPU is seated in the motherboard.

Then today I put on my Be Quiet! Dark Rock 3 heatsink and reassembled my PC. Now I'm going to run some benches and post my results at stock and then overclocking results. My idle temps are already 6c lower and soon we will see how it does at load.

Until next time...
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HI,
The rig does not exist until you upload images
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One note about liquid metal, I never apply it to anything from the tube. Always onto an applicator of sorts, brush, swab... whatever you use to apply it, but never directly to cpu.

My mothers i5 4570 is running hot, replaced cooler with cryorig h7, still getting 80c temps. Will probably delid it soon. Already did my 7700k, 4690, and friends 4790k with good results. My friends 4790k would hit 100c with any moderate load at stock speeds, had hard crusty paste under the lid with thick silicone glue. I think when more silicone is used by Intel, the thermal paste goes bad and temps rise.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Quote:
Originally Posted by EMUracing View Post

One note about liquid metal, I never apply it to anything from the tube. Always onto an applicator of sorts, brush, swab... whatever you use to apply it, but never directly to cpu.
Thanks for the tip, EMU! Yeah, I don't recommend applying liquid metal on the die while it is installed on the motherboard. That was a mess to pick up as it smears very easily.

Now on to my first results of using liquid metal...

The first thing I noticed while using liquid metal to cool my CPU was that my idle temps were down by roughly 6c on each core. Not a huge decrease but its something. Then I booted up Intel Burn Test which I feel is a much more reliable stress test than running Prime95. And a lot faster too. After roughly 30 minutes running IBT at maximum my 100% load temps were Core 0: 60c, Core 1: 61c, Core 2: 58c and Core 3: 58c.





With those results I saw an average temperature difference of 17.5c on each core. That's impressive! Of coarse, that is only at stock clock settings. The 4690K is a 3.5GHz processor with a turbo clock of 3.7GHz. Next I will run some tests on my final overclock, which is still to be determined, as my initial most stable OC was 4.3GHz at 1.150v which was done before deliding.

I should have my results done soon so stick around for more if you are interested in knowing my overclocking results with liquid metal.

Until next time...
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Discussion Starter #7
After hours of testing I've finally reached my preferred overclock. I hit 4.5GHz at 1.200v and am stable. That's an overclock of 1,000MHz over my stock base clock. Awesome! I could go higher but 4.5GHz was my target and I got it stable at temperatures never rising over 80c. For my testing I just run Intel Burn Test on Standard settings and then at Maximum. If you look at the timings on my IBT chart you can see that there is a reduction in time taken to run the test. I believe the difference is due to the overclock, which is good. I could probably hit 4.7GHz at around 1.3v but I rather not push it that far. I got a good chip and will run it at 4.5GHz from now on.

The difference between liquid metal and Intel's TIM is dramatic to say the least. Before deliding I could only hit 4.3GHz and my temperatures were over 95c which is way too hot to be running other than for the sake of benchmarking. I highly recommend overclockers to delid their processor and use liquid metal to cool the surface of their CPU die. After an hour or so of research all you need is a vise, or if you prefer paying more for a delid kit, or a thin razor blade. Although the razor blade technique is more risky than using a vise in my opinion and it also takes longer. As long as you're patient you should succeed in deliding your processor and applying liquid metal to your CPU die.

Below are my testing results. Feel free to comment or criticize about anything I have done during this fun little project. Thanks for following!

SuperPi:
Stock - 1M @ 9.391 seconds, 32M @ 8 minutes 24.601 seconds
4.5GHz - 1M @ 8.159 seconds, 32M @ 7 minutes 27.505 seconds

Intel Burn Test at 4.5GHz:
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IBT temperatures at 4.5GHz:
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Cinebench at Stock and at Overclock:
HB1dHpx.jpg
 

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Nice job on the delid, I did my 8700k on Friday but I used a Rocket 88 delid kit, not brave enough to use the vise method. Well worth the effort and I see 15C to 20C improvement depending on overclock and voltage.

I used to have a 4690k, really like that chip. I ran mine at 4.5 GHz also, seems like a good speed on the chip. Good speed without having to crank the voltage too high.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sin0822 View Post

nice job!
Thanks bro!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rfarmer View Post

Nice job on the delid, I did my 8700k on Friday but I used a Rocket 88 delid kit, not brave enough to use the vise method. Well worth the effort and I see 15C to 20C improvement depending on overclock and voltage.

I used to have a 4690k, really like that chip. I ran mine at 4.5 GHz also, seems like a good speed on the chip. Good speed without having to crank the voltage too high.
My thoughts exactly! I could have gone higher on the OC but my voltage would be around 1.30 - 1.35 for about 4.7GHz, I'm guessing. And after plateauing at 80c I just thought it was meant to be at 4.5GHz.
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I thought about getting the delid kit but they are expensive. I bought a drill vise for $11.00 off Amazon instead. Seemed like a no-brainer. As long as you're patient you won't mess up on the vise technique.
 
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