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Quote:


Originally Posted by The Bartender Paradox

does aonyone know if the xp-120 will work better verticaly or horazontaly? or is there any diffrence?

Upright is better since it accommodates the circulation in the heatpipes but it works sideways nonetheless. How much performance is lost I couldn't tell you.

WAIT!!!! I am thinking of the wrong HS...I'm thinking the Tower 112. The pipes, any heatpipes, work better if they are vertical.
 

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It mounts differently on different boards depending on the orientation of the CPU socket, most mount it horizontaly though.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Quote:


Originally Posted by YiffyGriffy

It mounts differently on different boards depending on the orientation of the CPU socket, most mount it horizontaly though.

i ment if i lay the case on its side or if its vertical.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by The Bartender Paradox

i ment if i lay the case on its side or if its vertical.

on its side sound like it would be cooler but what do i know?
 

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look at it this way: if there are heatpipes in teh 120, then optimal performance is achieved when it's vertical, because the liquid flows to the top, allowing the heatpipe cooling effect to work most efficiently
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by ATVkid*AFZ*

look at it this way: if there are heatpipes in teh 120, then optimal performance is achieved when it's vertical, because the liquid flows to the top, allowing the heatpipe cooling effect to work most efficiently

uh... liquid? i thought it was air cooling. so much to learn about OCing and keepin stuff cool
 

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heat pipes are filled with a liquid that evaporates at low temperatures, and when it evaportated it carries a lot of energy (heat) to the top of the pipe and then condenses back down.
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by YiffyGriffy

heat pipes are filled with a liquid that evaporates at low temperatures, and when it evaportated it carries a lot of energy (heat) to the top of the pipe and then condenses back down.

cool
 

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Quote:


Originally Posted by Waffles

cool

LOL...Pun intended?

In my line of work we use them on occasion. When I first started working about 16 years ago they were about $600-700 a piece and were only available in a few sizes. Given their cost no one wanted to toch them since they also tended to be fragile. Imagine my surprise when I found out I could get TWO, GOLD PLATED, SHAPED heat pipes with 2 huge machined aluminum plates, 2 mounting adapters 8 RAM heatsinks and all mounitng hardware for $30!!! (Zalman ZM80D for my 9800 Pro) They've come a long way. Oh, and they were almost always used horizontally!
 
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